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Author Topic: Electronic fuel injection conversions  (Read 495 times)
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RCAno
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Posts: 5


« on: 29 November, 2021, 04:38:46 AM »

Since my purchase of a 1971 Flavia 2000 coupe, I have joined the forum so I could become familiar with the joys and issues of Lancia ownership. Two items in particular that caught my eye are soggy brakes and installation of retractable seat belts.

That said, although I have read threads about electronic ignition, I have seen nothing mentioned in the forum about electronic fuel injection conversions, such as the conversions offered by companies such as Classic Fuel Injections (https://www.classicfuelinjection.co.uk). The conversions seems unobtrusive and by the looks of them quite easily reversed.

Do any forum members have experience with such conversions and is there any overall consensus over how effective such conversions are?
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DavidLaver
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Posts: 4227



« Reply #1 on: 30 November, 2021, 01:26:41 PM »

Its an interesting approach.  I think most here are "old school", and anyone wanting more power or better economy wouldn't be running a Flavia. 

I enjoyed a video of a Panda pickup at Goodwood from the customer photos page

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=o-yyP4t7CGg

From the FAQs:  

"Classic Fuel Injection - How Does it Save Fuel and Give More Power ?

Quite simply because both the fuel delivery and the ignition system are much more accurately controlled than with the original system you can make the most of every drop of fuel.

You do not have to run the system over rich just to get it to drive or start, the ECU will determine the exact amount of fuel required at any given time and make sure the engine receives that and no more.

By having a fully computer controlled ignition system you can specify the ignition advance at any engine speed or load rather than relying on the inaccurate centrifugal weights and vacuum advance mechanisms.

This means the ignition advance can always be set to exactly what is required for best power and economy.
With a correctly set system you ought to see Power Gains and Fuel Savings of around 10 to 15%"
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David Laver, Lewisham.
RCAno
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Posts: 5


« Reply #2 on: 01 December, 2021, 09:22:33 AM »

Many thanks for your reference to FAQs. This is also useful.

I decided to buy the Flavia is for its qualities as a comfortable long distance grand tourer rather than for any high performance Ė I look forwards to being able to use it for longer road trips in the future.

My interest in the available EFI conversions is the possibility to use E10 fuel (once other items such as fuel lines and fuel tank are adapted) since once Iím out on the road Iíd prefer to have the flexibility of choice for fuels. I accept that itís probable that using E10 fuel on such a trip would probably not adversely affect the engine so long as the system is flushed through with 98 Octane at the end of the trip and the car is not used so frequently.

At the moment, the effects of E10 are largely unknown but it would seem prudent to update the fuel system and if I am doing that at least I could consider installing an EFI system at the same time.
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DavidLaver
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Posts: 4227



« Reply #3 on: 01 December, 2021, 09:54:12 AM »


The "...and leave your mobile phone at home" line might be the one, or the long form "don't have those teething troubles and early in the ownership break downs getting the car on the button that put your spouse off ever trusting it to actually go anywhere".   

On the one hand its fun and satisfying knowing how many pumps before starting, on the other getting that wrong can ruin a day, or a holiday, or an event like a tour or holiday.   It might be this becomes as routine an upgrade as an electric fuel pump and electric fan.

Anthony Hussey told me how reliability is using a car for lots of short runs to expose a list of problems you then fix, then for a lot of slightly longer and harder runs to generate another list, and build it up and up until you can do a classic marathon or drive to friends the other side of europe worry free.

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David Laver, Lewisham.
RCAno
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Posts: 5


« Reply #4 on: 01 December, 2021, 01:49:24 PM »

The advice about using short runs to discover and resolve problems as well as working up reliability and trust is very useful.  You have hit the nail on the head about engaging spouseís trust before any plans can be laid.

I have taken some short reliability runs and I must say that the car still looks elegant and purposeful even on the back of a recovery truck (soggy brakes). Even the truck driver agreed.

Unfortunately Iím spending quite long periods overseas - even in these times - so Iíve had to leave the car at a (relatively) local workshop with the brief to recommission the car and make it safe for the roads.
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DavidLaver
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Posts: 4227



« Reply #5 on: 01 December, 2021, 06:41:08 PM »

Am not familiar with quite what brakes your car has, but some have fitted these instead of rebuilding the original.  Its long but fits well between a twin carb setup, not sure vs the mechanical or "70s" fuel injection or the single carb cars.  Have you joined the consortium?  Lots of knowledge in the news sheet archive and via the membership.

https://www.s-v-c.co.uk/product/dual-remote-servo/

http://www.flavia2000consortium.org.uk/Home/index.html
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David Laver, Lewisham.
RCAno
Member
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Posts: 5


« Reply #6 on: 02 December, 2021, 02:23:45 AM »

Thanks for the links.

I'm not sure which brake system I have and unfortunately since I'm out of country I can't check. I've also joined the consortium and found a lot of information there.

The workshop that is fettling the car hasn't reported any issues yet.
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Brian Long
Member
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Posts: 95

Aurelia B12, Flavia 2000 Coupe


« Reply #7 on: 03 January, 2022, 10:26:58 AM »

I have had five Flavias and the current one , for ten years now, is a Flavia 2000 coupe.
I agree with an earlier respondent, keep the car standard. The Solex carburettor is great. Fuel economy on long interstate trips in Australia is better than 30 mpg. Work your way through any components that might be affected by 'E' fuels. I inadventently put E85, I think, in mine and spent the next year or so throwing away clogged fuel filters!
No one has addressed your comment re retractable seat belts. I removed the rear seat arm rest ashtrays and mounted retractaable reels on plates welded to the body seams in the cavity behind the armrests. The seatbelt assemblies came with an escutcheon which covered the ashtray hole and the finished job looks like it is facory standard. I can send you photos if you wish.
Moral of the story; keep the car as it was designed, the makers knew what they were doing!
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RCAno
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Posts: 5


« Reply #8 on: 05 January, 2022, 05:58:29 AM »

Many thanks for your advice, Brian. I think in the end paying attention to the components that may be vulnerable to the 'E' fuels and keeping the carburettor is the way to go. Am I right in thinking that in addition to the rubber lines and components, brass is also vulnerable?

I saw your installation of the retractable seat belts in the forum. Looked very tidy.
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