Lancia Motor Club

Model Technical and Interest => Flavia => Topic started by: mikegamble on 06 August, 2014, 09:52:09 PM



Title: Re-commissioning a car.
Post by: mikegamble on 06 August, 2014, 09:52:09 PM
The car I've bought hasn't been on the road since 2002 when it went to Omicron for some work to and there is a bill for just over 4000 for this with the car, although I haven't seen it yet so I'm not sure what exactly was carried out.

The car still runs and drives but apart from the obvious things to do when putting a vehicle back onto the road after such a long lay up, is there anything that I should be aware of, or address that may be specific to these cars? All cars seem to have their unusual quirks!


Title: Re: Re-commissioning a car.
Post by: DavidLaver on 10 August, 2014, 10:25:07 AM
The car in question:

http://www.carandclassic.co.uk/car/C524284


Title: Re: Re-commissioning a car.
Post by: frankxhv773t on 10 August, 2014, 04:54:20 PM
Wow! That is going to be gorgeous. The interior looks spot on and that is often the hardest bit to bring back up to a good standard. I think that's a good price too.
A 2000 HF is probably my dream Lancia.

Frank


Title: Re: Re-commissioning a car.
Post by: lancianut666 on 11 August, 2014, 06:09:16 PM
obvious stuff like the brakes,brake fluid , exhaust, fuel lines,fuel filters, tyres, battery, anti freeze strength etc etc etc . my car has been off the road a bit longer but everything is fritzed, or has crumbled away such as the back light cluster. Your new car looks really good so it might be a case of some gentle test drives after you have done the safety stuff. I restored a 1967 Kugelfischer powered coupe a few years ago the main issue was the engine where one of the liners wasn't nipping the head gasket up enough requiring some replacement of the gasket at the crank end of the liner.
have fun
Clarkey


Title: Re: Re-commissioning a car.
Post by: HF_Dave on 11 August, 2014, 10:26:57 PM
You may have to remove the brake callipers and exercise the pistons . My Hf Coupe when I got it had the callipers re-built by the previous owner but was laid up . When I went to look at the car the water pump had a small leak and the brakes  were binding slightly. This did not deter me in the slightest I was buying it anyway ;D, On the trip home the brakes really got stuck on and the water leak turned into Niagra falls  :o.  so I reckon on changing the brake fluid , removing the callipers and exercising the brake pistons by getting someone to push the brake pedal while you watch the pistons and don't let them come out to far . Also check the condition of the fuel hoses going to the injectors they could be past their best, the last thing you want is an engine fire  ???. Also check the tank by draining it at the bung in the bottom if it. . there are a lot more bits to do but these would be my first jobs . The next thing is to enjoy the car , I love my one  ;D Thanks. David.


Title: Re: Re-commissioning a car.
Post by: lancialulu on 12 August, 2014, 09:12:11 AM
depending on the condition of the calipers I would always look to rebuild them - seal kits are cheap and if the dust covers are damaged at all then this can lead to further corrosion down stream. You can check the pistons thoroughly too.



Title: Re: Re-commissioning a car.
Post by: mikegamble on 13 August, 2014, 06:30:33 AM
Well the car arrived yesterday evening and was dropped off at the local garage for them to put it through an MOT and see how bad things are.

When the car arrived the battery wasn't connected and the delivery chap said that the car was winched on, not driven. I little worrying as I was told it was a runner.

Also, the bodywork was a little worse than described. I was expecting some welding/metalwork obviously but not quite this much. There also appears to be damage on the drivers side where the sill has been damaged and pushed up.

Also, the bonnet is damaged as is the roof but, on a positive note, the interior is lovely!

I'm guessing the answer is 'no' but are any repair panels available for the car, and if so, where and who does them?


Title: Re: Re-commissioning a car.
Post by: mikegamble on 13 August, 2014, 06:38:39 AM
Also, what oil would you recommend, AGIP F1?



Title: Re: Re-commissioning a car.
Post by: mikegamble on 13 August, 2014, 07:33:33 AM
Just popped down to the garage with 20 of fuel as I guessed it was bound to be on empty. They had just connected the (wrong sized) battery it started first turn of the switch, I was made up!

Any secret tips on how to get into the boot? The release lever isn't working properly and it's not quite disengaging.


Title: Re: Re-commissioning a car.
Post by: Justin McArdle on 13 August, 2014, 08:28:08 AM
Mike, I use Castrol Classic 20W/50 oil. I need to repair/renew my bonnet (leading edge is getting crunchy underneath). I have just returned from holiday in Italy and found someone selling 2000 HF bits incl. Bonnet and boot lid. I am going to contact him and will let you know what he has and his costs etc.
I would also strongly recommend getting the CD of the HF manuals from http://www.viva-lancia.com/specials/cd/flavia-cd.php.

Best of luck - great that we have another HF coming back on the road.


Title: Re: Re-commissioning a car.
Post by: mikegamble on 13 August, 2014, 09:33:43 AM
Mike, I use Castrol Classic 20W/50 oil. I need to repair/renew my bonnet (leading edge is getting crunchy underneath). I have just returned from holiday in Italy and found someone selling 2000 HF bits incl. Bonnet and boot lid. I am going to contact him and will let you know what he has and his costs etc.
I would also strongly recommend getting the CD of the HF manuals from http://www.viva-lancia.com/specials/cd/flavia-cd.php.

Best of luck - great that we have another HF coming back on the road.

I would be very interested in the boot lid. Mine is probably past saving!


Title: Re: Re-commissioning a car.
Post by: bobhenry999 on 13 August, 2014, 09:43:09 PM
Mike,

With regard to getting in to the boot, have you tried putting some pressure on the bootlid whilst someone operates the lever ?, that sometimes works.

Bob


Title: Re: Re-commissioning a car.
Post by: mikegamble on 14 August, 2014, 05:03:35 PM
Mike,

With regard to getting in to the boot, have you tried putting some pressure on the bootlid whilst someone operates the lever ?, that sometimes works.

Bob

We tried it yesterday morning with no luck but I'll pop down again tomorrow and have another go.
I've also been advised that if required the boot can be accessed via the back of the rear seat.
It's been a while since I've tried such gymnastics!


Title: Re: Re-commissioning a car.
Post by: frankxhv773t on 14 August, 2014, 08:05:54 PM
Standard fix for a stuck boot lid lock used to be to remove the back seat and make a stack of every socket set extension you can get your hands on then spend happy hours playing the party game of trying to get a socket onto the boot lock retaining bolts.

I don't have a clue what the layout of the bolts is on a Flavia / 2000 but if it lends itself to this solution it is better than damaging the boot lid.

However the Gurus may have some sneakier tricks.

Frank


Title: Re: Re-commissioning a car.
Post by: mikegamble on 15 August, 2014, 03:59:08 PM
I think if we don't manage to open my Monday, this will be the way forward. I just want to make sure I don't damage any of the interior.

Does the seat lift out fairly easily?


Title: Re: Re-commissioning a car.
Post by: mikegamble on 15 August, 2014, 04:37:51 PM
(http://i1084.photobucket.com/albums/j409/mikegamble1/Lancia%20Flavia/DSC_2192_zps9cb1e8b2.jpg) (http://s1084.photobucket.com/user/mikegamble1/media/Lancia%20Flavia/DSC_2192_zps9cb1e8b2.jpg.html)

(http://i1084.photobucket.com/albums/j409/mikegamble1/Lancia%20Flavia/DSC_21961_zpsbaffc961.jpg) (http://s1084.photobucket.com/user/mikegamble1/media/Lancia%20Flavia/DSC_21961_zpsbaffc961.jpg.html)

(http://i1084.photobucket.com/albums/j409/mikegamble1/Lancia%20Flavia/DSC_21981_zps7b5d43ee.jpg) (http://s1084.photobucket.com/user/mikegamble1/media/Lancia%20Flavia/DSC_21981_zps7b5d43ee.jpg.html)

A couple of pictures of her..


Title: Re: Re-commissioning a car.
Post by: mikegamble on 17 August, 2014, 08:39:57 AM
The clutch had finally decided to release itself and the car now runs/drives and is now on a ramp having an inspection to see what is needed for the MOT.

The structural rust just seems limited to the last foot of the rear of each sill which is structurally better that I was expecting and the garage are just producing a 'shopping list' of parts I will need to get her through the MOT and service her. It looks like it's not a too unrealistic prospect to expect that she'll have a MOT sometime in September.

I've also just got around to joining the Flavia Consortium so I'll hopefully soon be able to find out about repair panels etc for the wings for the cosmetic side of the rust.


Title: Re: Re-commissioning a car.
Post by: Brian Long on 29 August, 2014, 06:14:00 AM
My current flavia 2000 coupe had been off the road for the best part of twenty years . Check your tyres, they will probably need replacing. Strip and rebuild the brake callipers; they will probably need re sleeving. Likewise, replace rubbers in master cylinder. Worth having the booster itself checked. Mine developed a split in the diaphragm. All brake hoses should be replaced; they can swell internally and cause brakes to drag/ stay on.
Remove cover plate on sump and check whether there is a perforated mesh filter there which will need desludging. Flush petrol lines and fit new filter upstream of pump. Check mechanical fuel pump; diaphragm may have stiffened.Longer term, join the Flavia 2000 Consortium and get a full set of suspension rubbers. Replacing these will transform the feel and road noise level of the car.
After that enjoy it! I have just covered over 5000 km last month. A fabulous cruising car, it is my fifth Flavia.
Regards.
Brian Long (Australia ).


Title: Re: Re-commissioning a car.
Post by: mikegamble on 07 September, 2014, 08:13:24 PM
I'll have a look at these things. Hopefully the brakes are ok as they were rebuilt just before being put in storage and they seem absolutely fine. Most fluids/hoses/perishables will be changed shortly, I'm just waiting on a couple of things to arrive and then I have to start working out how to tackle the bodywork and locate some of the metal-work required.