Lancia Motor Club

Model Technical and Interest => Fulvia => Topic started by: petec2010 on 23 August, 2010, 10:11:12 PM



Title: light wieght Fulvia Zagato
Post by: petec2010 on 23 August, 2010, 10:11:12 PM
Hi all,

I race a Fulvia 1.3S and on my travels have stumbled across a light wieght Fulvia Zagato 1.3s, all aluminium panels bar one front wing which at some time has been replaced with steel. I have bought it without seeing it and believe it is in a very poor state of repair, almost broke in two I am told. Floor pans, sills etc are rotten but it is complete.

I can use the engine, gearbox and some running gear for spares but am now wondering if it would be worthwhile restoring, a lot of work rather than breaking for parts.


Can anyone advise a circa price for a restored vehicle and is it as rare as Ihave been led to believe

Look forward to hearing from you and thanks in advance

Pete


Title: Re: light wieght Fulvia Zagato
Post by: lancialulu on 23 August, 2010, 10:50:20 PM
Could be a "competitizione". Do you have chassis number?

Tim


Title: Re: light wieght Fulvia Zagato
Post by: petec2010 on 24 August, 2010, 02:57:08 PM

Hi,

Thanks for replying.

I,ve not even seen the vehicle yet, I am picking it up in a couple of weeks. I am told it has it's documents which I will publish, and cross my fingers !!

Cheers
Pete


Title: Re: light wieght Fulvia Zagato
Post by: ncundy on 24 August, 2010, 04:06:23 PM
There were 700 odd aluminium SZ s built, the exact numbers are in the books - or on the LMC database that Steve has built. I think about 100 or less RHD cars were built. Going on your description of its current state it will cost 20-25k to restore (if you do most of the work yourself) and will be worth about 15k (20k tops) when complete. If it is a Competizione then 27(?) were built and prices start at about 50k


Title: Re: light wieght Fulvia Zagato
Post by: ian on 24 August, 2010, 09:26:27 PM
Blimey!


Title: Re: light wieght Fulvia Zagato
Post by: petec2010 on 25 August, 2010, 08:07:04 AM

OUCH !!!

Thanks for your responses, at least I now have an appreciation of what I have bought and the manner in which I will treat my new acquisition.

The wish to rebuild is great but based on this info it is not an option which is financially viable or one I can afford as I am not gifted in the bodywork department, or any other for that matter!! So on this occasion the brain has beaten the heart into submission.

It seems, unless I am extremely lucky which I doubt, I will keeping the parts of use for my Lancia, engine, gearbox etc and breaking the rest for sale.

Should anyone out there need any parts I will be picking up the car the weekend after next and will post the details.

Thanks again

Pete


Title: Re: light wieght Fulvia Zagato
Post by: ncundy on 25 August, 2010, 08:32:14 AM
I would think that even if the bodyshell is beyond repair that you will have plenty of bits that can be used/sold on.

All the aluminum bits will be valuable, as will any suspension bits. The gearboxes had a higher final drive in so are pretty scarce and interior items are difficult to get hold of. So i wouldn't feel that you've made any great error of judgement.

Most have bought a scrapper at somepoint to keep thers on the road. If I could find an S1 LHD coupe as a scrapper I'd be interested.

Good luck with it.


Title: Re: light wieght Fulvia Zagato
Post by: petec2010 on 25 August, 2010, 09:49:54 AM

Thanks again,

Was not overly worried about this being a financial error, I tend to make these on a regular basis hence I am a relatively poor individual, it's just hard for me to break a Lancia of this beauty and era and sell it for bits, seems almost sacrilegious.

Fingers crossed it's better than I am led to believe and my heart can convinvce my brain it's worth a go (potentially one of those regular financial errors mentioned above)

Cheers


Title: Re: light wieght Fulvia Zagato
Post by: ColinMarr on 25 August, 2010, 12:36:25 PM
Pete,

It would be great if you could post us some photos to see how good or how bad it is. Even if you donít want to restore it, it might be that someone else with more hands-on skills and enthusiasm could think it worthwhile. Please donít rush to break it up!

Also, it would be interesting to know the serial number.

Some early all-aluminium bodied cars can look good and give lots of pleasure without having anything like the amount of money spent on theme that Neil suggests. This one in the photo below is Serial number 01474 from 1967.

Colin


Title: Re: light wieght Fulvia Zagato
Post by: chriswgawne on 25 August, 2010, 05:17:11 PM
Pete,
Dont be too downhearted. My wife has an alloy Fulvia Sport No 1155 which we have actually owned twice now. It is her 'daily driver' in Italy and is a joy to drive.
Jacky bought it for me for the first time in 1985 for the wheels which are FPS magnesium alloy. Because it looked so tatty - paint falling off the body, broken engine, broken lights, seized brakes etc - I put it away for spares without even realising it was alloy bodied. It was only about 4 years later that I realised what we had and that it looked far worse that it actually was. Also because it only had a 1200cc engine from new, even if the rear subframe mountings are a little suspect there isnt enough power to tear the body apart in the normal places and so you might be pleasantly surprised as to how good it actually is.
Some photos as Colin requested as well as the body number would be helpful.
Chris


Title: Re: light wieght Fulvia Zagato
Post by: petec2010 on 26 August, 2010, 12:10:22 PM

Colin / Chris

Thanks for your words of optimism. I am picking the car up a week on Saturday so will ensure that I post some pictures for your review, I will also know the numbers.

Spoke to the seller last night who said it comes with quite a bit of history and preious owner notes, perhaps someone will remember her.

Thanks
Pete