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Author Topic: Report on (slow) S2 Coupe rebuild progress  (Read 60073 times)
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lancialulu
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« Reply #240 on: 11 January, 2020, 03:36:16 PM »

Norman you may wish to check but the 2 empty holes on the regulator may be where the factory put in self tappers(!) to lock the regulator after adjustment. If thats the case you should also lock it as the effort of operation will move the regulator out of adjustment.....
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Its not the winning but taking part! or is it taking apart?
1955 Aurelia B12
1967 Flavia Vignale iniezione
1967 Fulvia 1.3HFR
1972 Fulvia 1600HF
1972 Fulvia 1600HF
1972 1600 Fulvia Sport
1979 2500 Gamma Coupe
1988 Delta 1.6GTi
1998 Zeta
Jaydub
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« Reply #241 on: 11 January, 2020, 05:09:13 PM »

Excellent work and very useful narrative on reassembling everything. It takes enough time to do the work without having to sit down and explain it all, so for that effort, thank you very much Norm. Keep up the good work.
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1600 HF. S2.
nthomas1
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« Reply #242 on: 12 January, 2020, 07:35:05 PM »

Looking great - but doesn't it all take time !

Maybe try some talc on the window channels until they bed in ??

You are absolutely right Simon about it taking a long time - especially for a mechanical novice like me!   Thanks for the talc suggestion.  I'll also have a chat with Omicron who supplied the channel and see if they have any suggestions.
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Norm Thomas
Ormskirk, Lancashire

Own:
1973 Fulvia S2 Coupe
Various modern cars
Previous Lancias: S2 Coupe and S3 Coupe in late 1970s
nthomas1
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« Reply #243 on: 12 January, 2020, 07:42:49 PM »

Norman you may wish to check but the 2 empty holes on the regulator may be where the factory put in self tappers(!) to lock the regulator after adjustment. If thats the case you should also lock it as the effort of operation will move the regulator out of adjustment.....

That's really useful input Tim.  I have the original screws, and yes, they are self tappers.  There was one on the driver side and two on the passenger side.  I thought they were a bodge by a previous owner but now I can understand their purpose.  The only challenge is whether to slacken the three machine screws that hold the regulator in place and jiggle the regulator around until the holes for the self tappers align, which would get my regulators back to where they were before disassembly. Or to drill new holes through the outer skin holes.  Decisions, decisions!   
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Norm Thomas
Ormskirk, Lancashire

Own:
1973 Fulvia S2 Coupe
Various modern cars
Previous Lancias: S2 Coupe and S3 Coupe in late 1970s
nthomas1
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Posts: 676



« Reply #244 on: 12 January, 2020, 07:45:21 PM »

Excellent work and very useful narrative on reassembling everything. It takes enough time to do the work without having to sit down and explain it all, so for that effort, thank you very much Norm. Keep up the good work.

Thanks John. I may well be too verbose for some, but as a novice mechanic myself I thought it worth including a lot of detail to help anybody else with a similar lack of mechanical expertise undertaking the task in the future!
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Norm Thomas
Ormskirk, Lancashire

Own:
1973 Fulvia S2 Coupe
Various modern cars
Previous Lancias: S2 Coupe and S3 Coupe in late 1970s
nthomas1
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Posts: 676



« Reply #245 on: 15 January, 2020, 01:17:21 PM »


Following on from Tim's comments I've attached small self tappers to keep the the window regulators in position.  There were two holes drilled in each inner door skin which lined up with corresponding holes in the regulators.  The holes for the three main attachment screws are quite large to allow some movement of the regulators during adjustment, so the self tappers are essential to avoid movement after final positioning. 


* a self tappers - Left copy.JPG (1021.83 KB, 2551x1254 - viewed 70 times.)
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Norm Thomas
Ormskirk, Lancashire

Own:
1973 Fulvia S2 Coupe
Various modern cars
Previous Lancias: S2 Coupe and S3 Coupe in late 1970s
nthomas1
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Posts: 676



« Reply #246 on: 15 January, 2020, 01:36:12 PM »


A couple more small jobs on the doors completed.  In each door there are two foam rubber blocks that the window rests again at the lowest point of travel, I presume to stop the window rattling.   I had removed these during disassembly and have now refitted them.  Also, there is a plate attached to the rail at the bottom of the door glass in each door.  The plates incorporate a small rubber block and stop the window glass from being raised too far.  They stop against an adjustable screw at the top of the door.  I have now refitted these. See pictures three and four.


* b Pads copy.JPG (806.55 KB, 1984x1286 - viewed 68 times.)

* c Pads copy.JPG (907 KB, 2126x1188 - viewed 66 times.)

* e plate copy.JPG (973.08 KB, 2268x1768 - viewed 60 times.)

* f Iplate stop.JPG (930.82 KB, 2268x1701 - viewed 62 times.)
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Norm Thomas
Ormskirk, Lancashire

Own:
1973 Fulvia S2 Coupe
Various modern cars
Previous Lancias: S2 Coupe and S3 Coupe in late 1970s
nthomas1
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Posts: 676



« Reply #247 on: 16 January, 2020, 08:29:45 PM »


I've been getting the door handles and locks ready for reattachment and have a question that I could do with some help with.  What would be the best lubricant to use on the lock mechanisms, and what is the best way to apply it?


* IMG_3257.JPG (866.35 KB, 1701x1268 - viewed 64 times.)
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Norm Thomas
Ormskirk, Lancashire

Own:
1973 Fulvia S2 Coupe
Various modern cars
Previous Lancias: S2 Coupe and S3 Coupe in late 1970s
jimbo64
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Posts: 32



« Reply #248 on: 16 January, 2020, 10:06:31 PM »

Hi norm I知 going to use wurth white, long-life maintenance grease with PTFE
I知 no expert but think it will be up to the job, nice work by the way
Jim
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frankxhv773t
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« Reply #249 on: 18 January, 2020, 09:08:14 AM »

For I job like that I go for grease in a spray can because it blasts into the nooks and crannies. However I am conscious that it is thinner in consistency than grease in a tub.
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nthomas1
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« Reply #250 on: 11 March, 2020, 09:06:48 PM »


Jim and Frank - thanks for that advice.  I think I'll use a spray grease to make sure I get into all of the nooks and crannies, then maybe then add some regular grease in specific areas.
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Norm Thomas
Ormskirk, Lancashire

Own:
1973 Fulvia S2 Coupe
Various modern cars
Previous Lancias: S2 Coupe and S3 Coupe in late 1970s
nthomas1
Rebel Poster
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Posts: 676



« Reply #251 on: 11 March, 2020, 09:10:49 PM »


I知 back from Spain so able to work on the car again.  I致e spent the last few days cleaning up the interior trim parts.  I致e used lots of elbow grease, and a bottle of the impressive Autoglym Vinyl & Rubber Care. I found the best approach on the grained vinyl parts to be a preliminary clean with the Autoglym, then a second application worked into the grain with with a small bristle brush using a rotary motion. 

My car had carpet glued to the tunnel under the gear lever but I plan to leave the rubber exposed when I re-trim the car so I had to remove all of the adhesive stuck to it. Mostly done with a finger nail, a few millimetres at a time, but worth the effort.

While the visible parts of the trim have come up really well, the undersides in some cases are in pretty poor condition - see the fourth picture below for a couple of examples.  I知 wondering what is the best way to treat them. I値l treat any exposed metal with rust remover, but I知 not sure what to about the areas of dense foam or other backing that are showing significant surface degradation.  One thought was to spray on some expanding foam to stabilise the surface, and then carve away any excess.   

I would welcome any advice.



* a .JPG (922.44 KB, 1843x1238 - viewed 50 times.)

* b .png (790.34 KB, 1134x332 - viewed 52 times.)

* c .JPG (1087.41 KB, 1559x1600 - viewed 55 times.)

* d.png (852.1 KB, 907x512 - viewed 56 times.)
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Norm Thomas
Ormskirk, Lancashire

Own:
1973 Fulvia S2 Coupe
Various modern cars
Previous Lancias: S2 Coupe and S3 Coupe in late 1970s
frankxhv773t
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« Reply #252 on: 12 March, 2020, 08:38:39 PM »

I have often thought of using expanding spray foam that way too but never had the occasion to try it. A word of warning though, check how much it expands and adjust application accordingly! I have had some exciting adventures with it when doing DIY jobs on the house and it is a devil to clean up when it has gone rouge on you. I await your progress with interest.
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fay66
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« Reply #253 on: 13 March, 2020, 08:55:29 AM »

Norman,
Soon after I put Fay back on the road I got fed up with getting covered in foam dust every time I went over a bump.
So I decided to replace all the rotten foam.
I removed all the lower padding at knee level and scraped out the old foam, then using the metal former and the semirigid outer cover I remade these using expanding builders foam.
It's a messy job and best if you can do all you want to do in one day, as after that everything hardens and clogs up.
I then cut off the excess with a craft knife.
It works well where you have the metal former and the outer cover, but if you have a part that relies on it shape to keep the foam into place, then you may find as I did, it distorts the the face of the component.
All in all I was about 80% successful, the major failure was the trim panel that runs under the instruments on the Berlina that connects to the air vents at either end of the dash.
Brian
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Own 1966 Fulvia 2C Berlina since 1997, back on road 11-1999.Known as "Fay"
1999 Suzuki Wagon R+ GL, now my daughters
2006 Renault Megane 1 5 Dci Sports Tourer
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fay66
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« Reply #254 on: 13 March, 2020, 09:02:26 AM »

here's one I made earlier Grin
Sorry it's the top one.
Brian

* Fay Crash Pad work.ZIP (2775.88 KB - downloaded 76 times.)
« Last Edit: 13 March, 2020, 09:05:54 AM by fay66 » Logged

Own 1966 Fulvia 2C Berlina since 1997, back on road 11-1999.Known as "Fay"
1999 Suzuki Wagon R+ GL, now my daughters
2006 Renault Megane 1 5 Dci Sports Tourer
Dedra Technical Adviser
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