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Author Topic: Racing a Lancia Delta HF Integrale 16v  (Read 24894 times)
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Thurbs
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« on: 15 March, 2017, 08:56:16 AM »

Hi all.

I bought myself a early 16v Delta back in Autum last year and am getting it ready for a season's racing this year.

I have been posting on pistonheads + I have been blogging about progress plus doing some videos.

http://www.pistonheads.com/gassing/topic.asp?h=0&f=99&t=1647429

https://lanciadeltaracing.com/

https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLmsJCCDm9ELZv8z-zEB4kYCAZfjytNqNY

If you guys are interested I am more than happy to keep this thread updated.
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Regards, Richard. | http://www.LanciaDeltaRacing.com | Lancia Delta HF Integrale 16v Group A Race Car | Lancia Delta HF Spares Car | Renault Clio 182 Race Car | BMW M5 Comp F10 Road Car
simonandjuliet
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« Reply #1 on: 15 March, 2017, 08:59:38 AM »

Definitely - look forward to reading about your exploits
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sparehead3
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« Reply #2 on: 15 March, 2017, 11:40:00 AM »

Also definitely ! We haven't had a thread on the Delta like this. Pictures are welcome and we don't remove the history on the forum - so it'll be preserved for the future.
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Steve Pilgrim
No.13575

1993 Delta HF integrale Evo II (Hammond's Icon - No.4)

http://www.lanciadb.co.uk/
Dilambdaman
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« Reply #3 on: 29 March, 2017, 10:11:38 AM »

Very welcome addition to the Forum - welcome Richard and do please keep the posts coming and especially pictures.

Robin.
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Robin Lacey 3222

1932 Dilambda
1992 Y10 GTie
2012 Delta Mk3
Thurbs
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« Reply #4 on: 19 April, 2017, 11:50:35 AM »

Put simply I am going to transform a 1990 Lancia Delta HF Integrale 16v from a shed in to a thoroughbred race car. The car is currently full of rust, has many bodged repairs, has no engine, no doors and is pretty much a wreck. Definitely not ready for the race track.

The plan is to dip the car, repair any damage, weld in strengthening plates, put in a group a rally cage and add the required safety and security features needed to win some races.

The plan is to race the car predominantly within the club racing circuit throughout England with a trip out to Europe also. The current calendar looks is starting with a visit to my local circuit in Norfolk at Snetterton (300 configuration) on the 1st & 2nd of April. Then a trip to Hampshire on the fastest circuit in the UK; Thruxton on the 22nd & 23rd of April. Silverstone (International) is next on the 27th & 28th of May which should be great with the wide open FIA circuit which is then followed by the legendary Spa Francorchamps on the 23rd to 25th of June. The north of England is next with Croft on the 22nd & 23rd of July and then the English West Country with a visit to Castle Combe on the 12th & 13th of August. Donnington Park (National) is next on the 9th & 10th of September followed by a trip north once more to Oulton Park on the 7th of October. The season finale takes the car to Brands Hatch, which will include proper night races on the 11th & 12th of November.

The plan is to race the car with the Classic Sports Car Club. I have completed a few rounds with them in 2015 and 2016 with a Renault Clio 182 in their Tin Top and New Millennium series reasonably successfully. For the Delta, the car is eligible for the Future Classics. Modern Classics and Open Series’.

Future Classics is designed for Sports, Saloons and GT cars from the 1970's and 1980's and is split into 2 groups with an overall winner for each decade. The class structure is based on engine capacity, allowing cars to battle it out all down the field and provide great entertainment. The grids are full of iconic cars from the period including Sierra Cosworths, Porsche 911s, Jensons and TVRs. The Lancia is in the A80 class, which is the highest and fastest class in the series for cars manufactured in the 1980s.

Modern Classics is designed for most production Saloon, Hatchback, Sports and GT models produced up to the end of 1999. Modern Classics attracts a wide range of cars from Alfa Romeo and Volkswagen through to BMW, Ferrari and Porsche. The Lancia is in the A0 class, which is the highest and fastest class in the series. Nothing short of a win will do for both series!

The races are run over forty minutes and include the added excitement of a mandatory pit-stop with a 30 minute qualifying session on the same day. Entries may be two drivers sharing a single car or as a two car team, however I am competing as a single driver. All race winning cars/drivers accumulate winners penalties, helping to stop the same car/driver dominating at every round.

Pictures: https://www.facebook.com/pg/LanciaDeltaRacing/photos/

Video: https://youtu.be/cy5CkhL3RaI
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Regards, Richard. | http://www.LanciaDeltaRacing.com | Lancia Delta HF Integrale 16v Group A Race Car | Lancia Delta HF Spares Car | Renault Clio 182 Race Car | BMW M5 Comp F10 Road Car
Thurbs
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« Reply #5 on: 19 April, 2017, 11:53:58 AM »

Dipping
In order to see the extent of any corrosion, damage and cracking in the shell we need to remove all of the paint, rust, sealant, filler and anything else which is not bare metal. The simplest way of doing this is a process called “dipping”.

In order to dip, the car needs extensive preparation work so that it is only steal which is exposed in the process. This means all aluminium, chrome, plastic, wiring and other parts need removing from the car.

When removed, the car is fully suspended in a heated caustic tank for two days. The mixture of chemicals in the tank dissolve all non-metallic material including grease and paint. When the car is taken out of the tank, the shell is power washed with very high pressure washer using fresh water, taking particular care through the seams.

The third step in the process is to dip the car again, this time in a acid treatment. The acid neutralises the case (caustic) chemical that removes the paint and other material. Again the car is removed and cleaned with very high pressure water and then again with extremely high pressure water.

The Damage
It is no surprise that after the dipping process a number of surprises have been uncovered which were not evident with all the paint and filler intact. Overall the shell is in good condition but there are a few areas which need remedial work. The front legs have rotted away and had a poor repair completed. The floor and roof have the small worm like holes visible and there are other areas of minor root. It is the left (or drivers) side of the car which had the main issue.

The rear quarter had taken a hit sometime in the past and there has been a reasonable attempt to put it right. What was made worse is when the ruler was broken out and compared to a group N rally car, the left rear had been deformed in by 5mm. Now Italian cars in the 80’s and 90’s are not renowned for their build quality and it may have left the factory with a similar tolerance, however we decided to source a new side and make the car dead square from all angles. In addition the whole outer and middle sil had completely corroded away and only some of the inner sil remained so sils were ordered at huge expense.

Repairing more Welding
In the meantime, the process of strengthening commenced in two key areas. The first is that strengthening plates were welded in to the known weak areas of the car and all of the different panels were seam welded together. With this additional welding, the shell is considerably stiffer which should translate to a handling platform that is sharper and easier to control when out on the circuit.
Once the panels, sils and cage had been sourced, this was all test fitted, checked, measured, tacked and then finally put in to place. Other cutting, fabrication and welding work has also been done to the front wheel arch to ensure the right amount of clearance is available on full lock with the suspension under full compression.

Once the car was made square again, we did a test fit of the seat, trying to get the ballast (me) as centre to the vehicle as possible. A small section has been removed from the tunnel and the seat has been moved rearwards as far as possible without snagging on the cage. The steering column and pedal box are being moved over so that legs and arms all line up with the controls being used. 
Bits which were sent off or ordered have started to arrive including a re-conditioned transfer box and front differential, rear differential, fire extinguisher,  electrical cut off, heater matrix & fan and most important a driver cooling system so I don’t boil alive.

Video: https://youtu.be/_XC1FTN04sg

Pictures: https://www.facebook.com/pg/LanciaDeltaRacing/photos/
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Regards, Richard. | http://www.LanciaDeltaRacing.com | Lancia Delta HF Integrale 16v Group A Race Car | Lancia Delta HF Spares Car | Renault Clio 182 Race Car | BMW M5 Comp F10 Road Car
Thurbs
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« Reply #6 on: 19 April, 2017, 11:56:15 AM »


Positioning
Driver positioning is really important when building a car for endurance so we took some time getting this bit right. The control surfaces the driver uses all need to line up with the natural ergonomics of being seated in the car. Italian cars are notorious for having off centre pedals, plus the need for brake bias adjustment we are using a floor mounted pedal box with integrated brake master cylinder. We have also decided to go with an electronic throttle and throttle body to give us more flexibility when it comes to engine mapping.
The seat has been mounted as low to the floor as possible which has resulted in a “legs out forward” position, meaning the OEM seat position was moved back significantly from the standard position. In essence, the driver’s seat is now mostly in the passenger foot well. This in turn means the gear linkage and steering column need to be extended, mounts fabricated and the new position fixed to ensure a comfortable drive.

Welding
All of the roll cage sections were welded in to place, including bars going right through the bulkhead in to the front turret in two different positions. In addition gussets were fitted to key angles and the cage was also welded to the body in key areas along the roof and sides. The final piece of the shell was the welding in of the jack mounting points for the air jacks in the corners of the car where the bulk of the cage meets the floor, given this is its strongest point.

Parts
Most of the parts ready for building have now arrived and some of them are a demonstration of engineering excellence.

Video: https://youtu.be/a1moYbigIh8

Pictures: https://www.facebook.com/pg/LanciaDeltaRacing/photos/
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Regards, Richard. | http://www.LanciaDeltaRacing.com | Lancia Delta HF Integrale 16v Group A Race Car | Lancia Delta HF Spares Car | Renault Clio 182 Race Car | BMW M5 Comp F10 Road Car
Thurbs
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« Reply #7 on: 19 April, 2017, 11:58:02 AM »

Building a car from scratch is a daunting prospect when there is virtually nothing from the original donor to go back in. This is complicated still further with the supply (or not) of parts coming through at the right time. I found many a job couldn’t be completed when it should because a small but vital part didn’t arrive. This is compounded by couriers who couldn’t care less and randomly deliver separate parcels of the same consignment over a week.

What followed was three weeks of 12+ hour days, fabricating brackets, modifying parts, waiting for parts and trying to have three people climb over what is actually a small car by today’s standards. We were also lucky that there was another Integrale off the road with a bottom end failure and John was kind enough to let me borrow many parts from his car in order to have it ready on time. These included the windscreen, lights, gearbox bracket, radiator bracket and much more. 

Getting the wheels on for the first time was a great feeling after so much work with the 17” wheels only just fitting underneath the arches when we put on some camber. We may have to take some material off the rear arches when the suspension is under full compression, however we can look at that if it is a problem later down the line.

The engine, gear box and transfer box went in without a hitch with all of the shafts lining up as they should. The radiators, cooling pipes all went in without a problem also. The only slight problem was with the brake and fuel lines. As these are running internal to the car they are made to order for the lengths you require and are stainless steel braded to ensure no leaks if there is a shunt. Sadly the supplier kept sending the wrong connectors in the wrong amounts and it took 4 deliveries until we had all the right bits together.

The car was finished on the Tuesday before the first planned race weekend at Snetterton and was shipped off to the mappers to fit the turbo & wastegate, programme the electronics and map the car. Sadly time waits for no man and it was just too much to get done in such a short space of time so plan B was put in to action and we prepared the Mitsubishi ready for a weekend’s racing.

Video: https://youtu.be/wQw-qZrUO0Y

Pictures: https://www.facebook.com/pg/LanciaDeltaRacing/photos/
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Regards, Richard. | http://www.LanciaDeltaRacing.com | Lancia Delta HF Integrale 16v Group A Race Car | Lancia Delta HF Spares Car | Renault Clio 182 Race Car | BMW M5 Comp F10 Road Car
sparehead3
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« Reply #8 on: 19 April, 2017, 12:52:31 PM »

Excellent posts Richard, I'm over in the West Country so will try and pay a visit at C.C. in August !
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Steve Pilgrim
No.13575

1993 Delta HF integrale Evo II (Hammond's Icon - No.4)

http://www.lanciadb.co.uk/
DavidLaver
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« Reply #9 on: 19 April, 2017, 02:20:47 PM »


Able to share any detail of the reinforcements to the shell?

The conrods and clutch are works of art...

Is that a twin filler?  (plate backed by two red cones, pair of hammer in the background) I'm guessing fuel goes in as air comes out all in a big hurry.  Any refueling in your series?

Are you permitted any cooling upgrades?   Going to cool diffs or gearbox(es)?

I do like the grey interior and structure.
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David Laver, Lewisham.
DavidLaver
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« Reply #10 on: 19 April, 2017, 02:25:21 PM »


Exhaust manifold is quite something...

Favorite bit for me?   Those airjacks. 
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David Laver, Lewisham.
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« Reply #11 on: 20 April, 2017, 02:29:38 PM »

Excellent posts Richard, I'm over in the West Country so will try and pay a visit at C.C. in August !
Great. Let me know closer to the time and I can send you a ticket for free entry over the weekend. Anyone else who wants a tickets to any other events, please get in touch. I usually get between four and eight for a weekend. I need two myself but usually have some spare.

Able to share any detail of the reinforcements to the shell?
This was the most interesting bit for me as I was pretty ignorant of Delta shells and their weaknesses. John from jjperformance.co.uk has done all the strengthening work on the shell so he can share the precise details. When I first got it from Tanc Barratt, John showed me on the car when it was yellow where all the weak spots are, where they rot and crack. The shell from this perspective was not too bad, it was only later when it was dipped did we find the side had been shunted in 5mm but filler and paint had masked it all.

In summary, what happened was:
- Visited Walkers and went to look at the group A car they have there and took loads of pictures and talked it through with Steve
- Got a copy of the Arbath CAD drawings for their strengthening kit, this was mostly a disappointment as it was just tiny bits of metal covering only small areas
- Got hold of the roll cage (which is replica of the factory group A)

We then
- Cut out and made the inner arches larger to get more lock on full compression
- Seam welded all the panels
- Plated over the key weak areas of the shell not covered by the cage
- Welded in the cage, including through the firewall in two places to the front turrets. The rear cage is on and over the rear turret so there is huge strength there
- Finally (and we haven't done this yet) we need to put a front strut brace in-between the front turrets, but that is a last minute job as it gets in the way of the engine.

The conrods and clutch are works of art...
Agreed. The crank, head and valves are also machined to perfection, all matched and balanced to within 1/2 a gram or something silly.

Is that a twin filler?  (plate backed by two red cones, pair of hammer in the background) I'm guessing fuel goes in as air comes out all in a big hurry.  Any refuelling in your series?
Yes correct. This is a FIA twin dry break re-fuelling system and you use one of these to fill up with: http://www.demon-tweeks.co.uk/motorsport/refuelling/atl-refuelling-bottles 20L can be done in a matter of seconds. Most of the time I will be doing 40 minute races which should be fine with a 80L tank, but I am interested in Club Enduro which run a 2 hour race with a mandatory stop for fuel. I will need to run the car to know how much fuel I will need as it varies from track to track. You can only put 50L in on one stop so hopefully I can do 2 hours on 130L or I will be doing some lift and coast or turn down the boost to make it last.

Are you permitted any cooling upgrades?   Going to cool diffs or gearbox(es)?
I am competing in a relatively open series where you can do pretty much what you want as long as it is original engine and gearbox type, silhouette and original suspension pickups. So, cooling is free, as are diffs.

Cooling is using a Walkers combined oil, water and intercooler radiator which they use on their rally cars. These are not particularly bigger than standard, but are constructed so the fluids go through each and every channel through the radiators before being re-circulated, whereas most OEM the water flows straight from the inlet to the outlet. The channels are also smaller, more numerous and you get much greater cooling efficiency. The pumps are upgraded to motorsport spec to deal with the constant higher RPM demands also.

The diffs are standard at the moment but were rebuilt by a company in Italy. As this is a circuit car we are going to see how the mechanical diff works as opposed to a plated diff which is less progressive when it locks up. The gearbox is a special one, also from Italy with dog ring gears and ratio’d up for about 150MPH. It may mean I am bouncing off the limiter at somewhere like Spa but everywhere else it should give better drive. It also has a strengthening plate in it to stop the whole thing from twisting around when the power is applied. 

The principle was that the drive train should deal with 600BHP reliably in a rally environment which is what Walkers build most of their cars to withstand. The Fiat lump can be raced reliably with 600 when it is on race fuel but 520 is more realistic on pump fuel (which is what we must use). We are using it on a circuit which is easier in some respects (less bumps, dirt, standing starts, slow speed poor airflow) but harder on others (longer duration, higher RPM, higher average speed, [nearly] always tarmac). I am not going to say what power it is going to run as this then becomes a target for others to beat, but it will be more than 400.

I do like the grey interior and structure.
John used it on one of his other cars so I copied that. The factory cars were lighter than I have done it but it strikes the right balance between not causing any glare and not being too gloomy.


Exhaust manifold is quite something...Favorite bit for me?   Those airjacks. 
The exhaust is currently the object of hate given it has prevented me from racing! I can appreciate its engineering though... The air jacks will make the weekends so much easier given how often you need to put the car up. For those who don't know... every time you run the car you:
- jack the car up
- corner weight (jack the car down, then up again)
- check wheels for play
- take the wheels off
- check pads, disks, fuel lines, brake lines for splits, tares and other anomalies
- visually and spanner check every single nut, bolt, screw and head you can see and access
- check all seals for leaks
- check all levels
- calculate fuel, put fuel in
- corner weight, make any adjustments (multiple raising and lowering)
- check toe, camber and caster on all four wheels (this in its self can mean 10 sessions of raising and lowering the car)
- warm up the engine & transmission
- put in the right wheels and tyre combinations
- adjust pressures
- drop the car and go

It has probably added 100KG to the weight which I could ill afford to do but it is perhaps the only part of the build which I have compromised ultimate performance for luxury on.
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Regards, Richard. | http://www.LanciaDeltaRacing.com | Lancia Delta HF Integrale 16v Group A Race Car | Lancia Delta HF Spares Car | Renault Clio 182 Race Car | BMW M5 Comp F10 Road Car
DavidLaver
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« Reply #12 on: 20 April, 2017, 04:14:23 PM »


With those air jacks you'll ENJOY getting it up and down - and will be more inclined to clean and check and adjust etc.  Also a labour saver in the sense of needing one less crew?  At least won't annoy and or wear out the crew jacking up and down.  Less wear and tear on knees and elbows.

It really does make it "an endurance racer".  The installation of them is lovely as well.
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David Laver, Lewisham.
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« Reply #13 on: 20 April, 2017, 07:25:40 PM »

Hi all. This is the thread now caught up as this was the weekend of the 1st and 2nd of April.

In this episode we execute plan B as the Lancia sadly wasn’t finished in time.

After extending hours well in to the small hours we had the car ready on Wednesday at the tuners. Sadly, all of this was in vane due to a “miss understanding” between the exhaust fabricators and the turbo people. A new manifold wasn’t going to be ready in time so we switched to plan B.

Plan B involved using a track ready Mitsubishi Evo 4, throw the stuff on it needed to race and see how I get on. Little did I know the long nights wouldn’t be ending anytime soon! On Wednesday the following bits were added:

    Rain light
    Kill switch
    Transponder
    Tow Loops
    Seat rail taken out and fixed in place with a seat fitting
    Spare seat removed

All done for about 9pm which was nice.

Thursday we went to Mallory to make sure the car was all good and get some laps under the belt. The car ran faultlessly all day getting in to the 52’s and I was confident I could do reasonably well over the weekend…. I drove to the circuit that night and set up ready for testing on Friday and all was well.

Friday Session 1 – after 5 laps the exhaust manifold gasket which is mated to the turbo manifold failed, resulting in no boost. Removed 3 studs, rounding off one of them, used some high temp silicone sealant and replaced it.

Friday Session 2 – Missed it due to fixing the gasket.

Friday Session 3 – Blew the gasket again but also blew out a bung on the manifold which caused flames to come out of the bonnet. Phoned up for some help, sourced some new studs, gasket and bungs and got a knight in shining armour to come from West Midlands to help out.

Friday Session 4 – Missed it due to no parts.

Friday Night – Chicken out of taking off the exhaust manifold but instead replaced gasket, replaced studs, rounded off a exhaust stud in to the head, found a long bolt and got it back on with about 3 threads left. Bed @ 12am.

Saturday Morning – Finished off jobs from last night and prepped for Qualifying. My helper also brought along a pit to car radio so we stuck that in as well.

Saturday Qualifying – Managed 2 laps with glorious boost before losing it all again. Clocked a slow 2:18 but carried on doing 3 laps so I qualified for the race. It then transpired I had exceeded track limits so they shunted me back to 32nd or something stupid from 12th. Checked and re-checked everything. Did all bolts up super tight but couldn’t find the source of any boost leak.

Saturday Race – Out of the assembly area I could tell there was still no boost so preceded to race as a low compression 2l NA car. Made up about 8 places on the first few laps, had a good fight with a Elise and a Fiesta before getting stuck in second gear. DNF with a gear linkage failure.

Saturday Night – Drilled and bolted the gear linkage (it was the bushes which had failed). Took off the whole front of the car including the radiator, intercooler, all exhaust and turbo manifold. Tracked down the boost leak to a rubber hose which had failed right where we couldn’t feel for it when the car was assembled. Cut about 2 inches off the hose where the leak was and then preceded to re-locate *everything* in order to get everything connected back together. 2 more studs were rounded and the thread which had the failed bung come out earlier was also knackered. Phoned another knight who arrived at 11pm with some more tools to file, grind and bodge to get it all ready. My second knight did all this after spending all day Saturday running 2 clios at Oulton Park with 750 Clio 182 having one in the barrier and one in the gravel! What a legend. Bed at 1:30am.

Sunday Morning – Woke up at 7, managed to get the studs and bolts to go in after more filing, drilling and grinding. Connected everything up, filled it with water, got it up to temperature and went for a test drive. Lots of boost, no leaks of air or fluids and everything was finally looking good.

Sunday Qualifying – Out of the assembly area still had loads of boost! Warmed up the tyres ready for a “banker” lap only to notice st loads of smoke coming out of the back. Went in to the pits where I was parked in the fire area. Once the marshals were happy I wasn’t about to die in an oil based inferno, my (now large) pit crew opened up the bonnet and diagnosed the dipstick had been blown out and pissed oil everywhere. We then went back to the pits, tipped 5L of brake cleaner over the engine without setting it alight and cable tied the dipstick down. Got back out, warmed up the tyres again and started a flying lap. Half way down the Bentley straight something in the drive train let go with a clonk and then a wine was present. I finished that lap (so I qualified, in 12th again as it happens) and when crossing the line noticed the oil pressure light was on. I then parked it up and sat out the rest of the session with the men and women of orange.

Saturday Lunch – After getting a tow back to the pits, the team diagnosed a knock in the bottom end and we withdrew the car. At that point we gave up, put the car on the trailer and did the ”drive of shame” leaving just after lunch.

Hopefully the car is finished and we finally get out on track for some shakedown and testing.

Video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fHryJZU0saQ

No pictures this time, sorry. There are some laps on the video of the Mitsubishi.
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Regards, Richard. | http://www.LanciaDeltaRacing.com | Lancia Delta HF Integrale 16v Group A Race Car | Lancia Delta HF Spares Car | Renault Clio 182 Race Car | BMW M5 Comp F10 Road Car
sparehead3
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« Reply #14 on: 21 April, 2017, 11:07:08 AM »

Great. Let me know closer to the time and I can send you a ticket for free entry over the weekend. Anyone else who wants a tickets to any other events, please get in touch. I usually get between four and eight for a weekend. I need two myself but usually have some spare.

That's wonderful  - thanks very much and I'll look forward to it

https://castlecombecircuit.co.uk/race-days/cscc-august-weekender/12/8/2017/ - noted the link here
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Regards,
Steve Pilgrim
No.13575

1993 Delta HF integrale Evo II (Hammond's Icon - No.4)

http://www.lanciadb.co.uk/
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