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Author Topic: Flamina Touring Brake Lock Issue  (Read 4999 times)
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pchflyer
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Posts: 12


« on: 01 September, 2016, 06:47:00 PM »

New owner of a Flaminia Touring and new to the forums. My car is in overall very good condition, but it has the well-known issue of vacuum brakes locking after a firm application. Receipts from the previous owner indicate the original brake system, including the servo, had been serviced about 10 years ago with unknown mileage since. I can drive it if I let the pressure slowly bleed off or just force the car to move from a stop until the system releases. I read that it could be a restriction in the master cylinder or the servo unit. Is there one component that is more likely to be at fault than the other? Any on-road fixes for driveability before I have the whole thing taken apart again?

« Last Edit: 01 September, 2016, 08:38:12 PM by pchflyer » Logged
Charles Frodsham
Senior Member
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Posts: 152



« Reply #1 on: 01 September, 2016, 09:08:42 PM »

Hi and congratulations on buying your new Flaminia. I am sure there are a lot of us that would like to see some pictures here!

There is a lot of experience on this forum on Flaminia brakes, so hopefully you should get some useful advice.

In my own limited experience ( I have a Flaminia PF coupe), I would suggest it may be a servo problem. However, all the brake components must be in good condition for the system to work properly, so you may need to revise the master cylinder and wheel cylinders.

I have been plagued by brake problems over the last few years, and have only now achieved trouble free operation. I used a well known UK specialist to rebuild master cylinder and servo, but continued to get problems. The servos are particularly prone to problems. In the end I purchased a ' new' servo from LanciaClassic in the Netherlands. These have corrosion free internals built around an original unit, and are imported from the USA. It was quite expensive, but I must say it does actually work...and nicely...which is unusual for Flaminia servos!!

I also used BG developments, who manufacture Dunlop aluminium wheel cylinder units, that do not corrode and subsequently damage the internal seals.

There is a Dunlop brake manual which is excellent if you can get a copy......maybe the club has a copy?

I hope this may be of some help

Charles
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Charles Frodsham
Senior Member
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Posts: 152



« Reply #2 on: 01 September, 2016, 09:11:27 PM »

Hello again

Just a thought, if you disconnect the vacuum hose from the servo does the problem disappear?

Be careful thoughts the brakes will be very weak...just for diagnosis.

Charles
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Dave Gee
Senior Member
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Posts: 121


« Reply #3 on: 01 September, 2016, 09:28:46 PM »

Charles is right. I would go for the servo and a good test is to remove the vacuum pipe to see if the brake releases. If you look on the Italian ebay site a company there is selling reconditioned servos for Fulvia, Flavia and Flaminia for around 400 euros.

On my Flavia I have fitted a new dual in-line servo which is meant for a kit car but looks period.  This was developed by the Flavia Consortium. Several friends have also fitted this servo successfully to their Flaminias. For them, the only modification needed was to fit a T piece to the brake line to take the pressure switch for the brake lights.

While at Silverstone this year, I was talking to a company which has developed a 4-pot brake calliper for the front brakes on a Flaminia. The cost is around £500 for a pair of callipers and they bolt on without any modification. This is something that I am going to look into over the winter, for my Flaminia.

Dave Gee
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mgmalatt
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Posts: 8


« Reply #4 on: 01 September, 2016, 10:07:45 PM »

Hi, there are three likely reasons for this.
It could be:
- The handbrake stuck - It works on the rear discs, and you'll need to get under the car to check it
- A sticky or frozen caliper piston, or
- The master cylinder holding pressure.

First thing I would do is check whether the brake pedal is somehow holding on and maintaining pressure - just pull the pedal upward and see if that fixes it
Failing that, get the car on some axle stands and try to rotate each wheel. Make sure the handbrake is off, and never work on a car that's only supported by a jack.
If one or both rears are stuck, it might be the park brake. Get under and see if the mechanism is jammed.
If it's not that, and only one wheel is stuck, it's a caliper, and you might get away with just a caliper rebuild. If you're doing one though, you may as well do all four.
If more than one wheel is stuck, it's probably the master cylinder or the servo.
Crack the bleed screws on the stuck calipers. If fluid comes out fast, there is residual pressure in the system. In this case, call a Lancia expert! The booster and master system is complex and needs someone who knows them well. At least if you've gone through the steps above, you've got some idea what you're in for.
Good luck and I hope we see her on the road soon.
Matt
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fay66
Permanent resident
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Posts: 5867



« Reply #5 on: 01 September, 2016, 11:49:41 PM »

Hi and congratulations on buying your new Flaminia. I am sure there are a lot of us that would like to see some pictures here!

There is a lot of experience on this forum on Flaminia brakes, so hopefully you should get some useful advice.

In my own limited experience ( I have a Flaminia PF coupe), I would suggest it may be a servo problem. However, all the brake components must be in good condition for the system to work properly, so you may need to revise the master cylinder and wheel cylinders.

I have been plagued by brake problems over the last few years, and have only now achieved trouble free operation. I used a well known UK specialist to rebuild master cylinder and servo, but continued to get problems. The servos are particularly prone to problems. In the end I purchased a ' new' servo from LanciaClassic in the Netherlands. These have corrosion free internals built around an original unit, and are imported from the USA. It was quite expensive, but I must say it does actually work...and nicely...which is unusual for Flaminia servos!!

I also used BG developments, who manufacture Dunlop aluminium wheel cylinder units, that do not corrode and subsequently damage the internal seals.

There is a Dunlop brake manual which is excellent if you can get a copy......maybe the club has a copy?

I hope this may be of some help

Charles

If Pchflyer would care to pm me his address I'll burn a copy of the Dunlop/Girling brake manual.

Brian
8227 Cool
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Own 1966 Fulvia 2C Berlina since 1997, back on road 11-1999.Known as "Fay"
1999 Suzuki Wagon R+ GL, now my daughters
2006 Renault Megane 1 5 Dci Sports Tourer
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pchflyer
Member
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Posts: 12


« Reply #6 on: 01 September, 2016, 11:53:51 PM »

Thanks all for the advice. I have the car temporarily at another location, so it will be some weeks before I can troubleshoot again. The problem cropped up all of a sudden after I had already put some 1300 relatively trouble-free miles on it. It appears more that the system is not releasing pressure, rather than just (a) crusty brakes. Either the master cylinder is not releasing, or the servo is not releasing. If it is the servo, I'd like to explore the retrofit of a new dual circuit servo, especially if it's reversible, should I want to reinstall the original equipment. If anyone has a diagram of the installation that would help.



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Jay
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Posts: 273



« Reply #7 on: 02 September, 2016, 10:57:39 AM »

Nice to see another contributor,

My car developed this problem, about 200miles after purchasing I got the impression that this was a known fault on the car but a quick Servo strip down gave it a bit more life. But the brakes started to bind quite a lot and I started to fall out of love with the car, so a quick phone call to Norfolk suggested that next time they seized just loosen the pipes on the servo to each of the circuits to free the brakes and ascertain which ones were binding.  It turn out the backs were sticking more than the fronts, and as the all the pistons had been previously lined 15 years prior, I sent the servo to them for a complete rebuild. Since then the brakes have been really strong and absolutely 100%, although you do need to drive these car regularly.

I believe that the back brakes binding were part of the cause for my stub axle to sheer a couple of years ago, another thread on this forum. As when I check the clutch it wasnít in great condition with so much burning and cracking, where I think someone (before me) had just tried to fight the brakes. Luckily I had an old spare, and if the brakes were jammed all this torque would have been taken up through these shafts.


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« Last Edit: 02 September, 2016, 11:00:36 AM by Jay » Logged

Julian Wood, Kingston, London
pchflyer
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Posts: 12


« Reply #8 on: 02 September, 2016, 02:54:13 PM »

Thanks for the warning about stressing the clutch and stub axels. Fighting locked brakes with the drivetrain is not fun, but I had to do something with a line of cars behind me honking their horns. I haven't driven the car since the problem cropped up. I'm wondering how complicated a removal and reinstallation of the servo is? Is it fully described in the Dunlop manual? I've done many conventional brake jobs, but I have very limited space to work on this one and if it's a two-person job or requires special tools I need to make other arrangements.
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Jay
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« Reply #9 on: 02 September, 2016, 03:49:11 PM »

I also did it (fight the brakes) once and you can really feel the heat generated by those inboard rear discs.  

Looking back I sent the master cylinder, the servo and reservoirs, although they used all 3 components on their jig, they only refurbished the servo, as the other parts were fine. Removing the servo is a very straightforward 1 person job, as its high in engine compartment, with easy access to the 5 pipes and 4 bolts holding it on. 

The master cylinder is much dirtier and painful job, as itís under the car, but still 1 person.  


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« Last Edit: 02 September, 2016, 03:50:50 PM by Jay » Logged

Julian Wood, Kingston, London
frankxhv773t
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« Reply #10 on: 02 September, 2016, 04:41:38 PM »

If the master cylinder is underneath the car then what is that sticking out of the front of the servo? I am confused and in need of educating.
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Jay
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Posts: 273



« Reply #11 on: 02 September, 2016, 04:53:35 PM »

Itís a remote servo, the thing at the end is just a nut on the end of the remote master (booster) cylinder. Here's a better picture of the whole assembly.

It's very easy to get to, unlike the one on the Fulvia Sport S1 (RHD), which is well hidden in front of left hand wheel bedded deep in the arch and behind the light assembly.   


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Julian Wood, Kingston, London
pchflyer
Member
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Posts: 12


« Reply #12 on: 02 September, 2016, 05:23:19 PM »

I'm thinking of the bleeding process once it's all back together. Not being familiar with this setup yet, are there two separate resevoirs/ circuits, or is it one supply from the brake pedal on? I have a Flaminia Berlina shop manual-does that use the same setup?
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Jay
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« Reply #13 on: 02 September, 2016, 06:05:44 PM »

In theory itís very easy, single reservoir which feeds all circuits and this is the nice part, it has its own pressure bleeding pump built in to the reservoir, absolutely brilliant. So connect all the pipes, pour in the fluid, pump up the pressure a couple of times, then go to each corner and slacken until all the bubbles are gone, remembering to top up and keep up the pressure. So a 1 person job with no pressing/depressing the brake pedal, whilst arsing rounding with the bleed nipple.

BUT thatís the theory, in reality the rear calipers are near impossible to get to, especially the nipples, there is a hatch in the boot, but that doesnít help much. So if you have big hands, good luck, I think Charles made a stubby bent spanner to help.   

I think all Flaminias have the same arrangement but obviously some are disc whilst others are drum. 
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Julian Wood, Kingston, London
frankxhv773t
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« Reply #14 on: 02 September, 2016, 09:40:28 PM »

Jay, I actually dismantled a wreck of a Berlina and it never occurred to me that the actual master cylinder was somewhere else! I think it's back to school on Flaminia brakes for me.
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