Lancia Motor Club Forum Banner
31 October, 2020, 05:00:16 AM *
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.

Login with username, password and session length
News: Need to contact the Forum Administrator? e-mail forum.admin@lanciamc.co.uk, for Database Administrator e-mail database.admin@lanciamc.co.uk      -      Copy deadline for Viva Lancia is 12th of each month.      -      For Events e-mail events@lanciamc.co.uk      -      To Join the club go to http://www.lanciamc.co.uk/join.htm
 
   Home   Help Search Calendar Register  
Pages: 1 [2]   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: Flamina Touring Brake Lock Issue  (Read 5197 times)
0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.
fay66
Permanent resident
**
Posts: 5878



« Reply #15 on: 03 September, 2016, 12:01:18 AM »

Nice to see another contributor,

My car developed this problem, about 200miles after purchasing I got the impression that this was a known fault on the car but a quick Servo strip down gave it a bit more life. But the brakes started to bind quite a lot and I started to fall out of love with the car, so a quick phone call to Norfolk suggested that next time they seized just loosen the pipes on the servo to each of the circuits to free the brakes and ascertain which ones were binding.  It turn out the backs were sticking more than the fronts, and as the all the pistons had been previously lined 15 years prior, I sent the servo to them for a complete rebuild. Since then the brakes have been really strong and absolutely 100%, although you do need to drive these car regularly.

I believe that the back brakes binding were part of the cause for my stub axle to sheer a couple of years ago, another thread on this forum. As when I check the clutch it wasn’t in great condition with so much burning and cracking, where I think someone (before me) had just tried to fight the brakes. Luckily I had an old spare, and if the brakes were jammed all this torque would have been taken up through these shafts.


Here you go
file:///C:/Users/Owner/Downloads/FFF_Dunlop_Duplex_S2_Eng.pdf.

Brian
8227 Cool
Logged

Own 1966 Fulvia 2C Berlina since 1997, back on road 11-1999.Known as "Fay"
1999 Suzuki Wagon R+ GL, now my daughters
2006 Renault Megane 1 5 Dci Sports Tourer
Dedra Technical Adviser
Charles
Senior Member
*****
Posts: 146



« Reply #16 on: 03 September, 2016, 02:05:49 PM »

I keep my Flaminia brake servo (as freshly serviced by Omicron) on a shelf in my garage!  For the last three years I have been driving around with one of these - http://www.s-v-c.co.uk/product/dual-remote-servo/ - which was easy to fit and works a treat with no hint of problems.  I had to make a couple of simple brackets which mount to the original mounting cotton reels plus one small bracket fixed to the inner wing.  Also a hydraulic switch for the brake lights was required. The whole thing is easily reversible (i.e. put back to original) with about an hour's work but I like the reassurance of knowing that when I hit the pedal, the car will stop.


* SANY0228.JPG (1342.09 KB, 2816x2112 - viewed 192 times.)
Logged

Augusta berlina, Appia S3 berlina
Flaminia convertible 2.8 3c Touring
Beta spider S1 1600, Gamma berlina S1
Gamma coupe S1, Delta 1.6 multijet
Charles Frodsham
Senior Member
*****
Posts: 155



« Reply #17 on: 03 September, 2016, 05:53:34 PM »

Lots of good information guys.

The servo obviously causes a lot of issues as can be seen from the replies.

If you want to keep the car standard, with standard/original pipe work, and have superb brakes, year in and year out, without having to do periodic rebuilds, to my mind the ClassicLancia item cannot be beaten, as it fundamentally removes the corrosion issue and also the internal component wear that components of this age will undoubtedly have. This isn't an advert, just the result of a lot of time and money! I wish I had just done it sooner.
Logged
pchflyer
Member
**
Posts: 12


« Reply #18 on: 04 September, 2016, 04:56:14 AM »

Lots of good information guys.

The servo obviously causes a lot of issues as can be seen from the replies.

If you want to keep the car standard, with standard/original pipe work, and have superb brakes, year in and year out, without having to do periodic rebuilds, to my mind the ClassicLancia item cannot be beaten, as it fundamentally removes the corrosion issue and also the internal component wear that components of this age will undoubtedly have. This isn't an advert, just the result of a lot of time and money! I wish I had just done it sooner.
Can someone explain again the functional differences between the ClassicLancia-type servo and the original unit? I do see the original has a separate fitting for the brake light sensor, and what else? Thanks for the great info.
Logged
Brian Long
Member
****
Posts: 81


« Reply #19 on: 04 September, 2016, 11:42:29 AM »

Have you checked your hoses to make sure they haven't swelled internally. The booster can force fluid into the calipers but the pressure can't relieve because it is trapped in the caliper(s).
Logged
Charles Frodsham
Senior Member
*****
Posts: 155



« Reply #20 on: 04 September, 2016, 07:58:53 PM »

Good point Brian about the flexible pipes.

The 'Classic Lancia' servo is basically an original servo with re-engineered internals.....stainless steel material for pin and both piston housings. Although sold as 'new' you have to provide a donor servo so that production can continue. So all fittings, sensors, operation exactly as the original. As far as I can see the only problem is the price...but you should only ever have to buy one.
Logged
AandSRuggeri
Member
*
Posts: 8


« Reply #21 on: 05 September, 2016, 11:23:48 PM »

Hi there, In my opinion, the Flaminia as delivered from the factory has pluperfect brakes, way better than anything of the period that I've driven and dare I say it, much better than a lot of considerably more modern cars as well. True, a wobbly servo will provide no end of entertainment - I remember that my GT had a particular wheeze for pulling violently to the left on the first couple of applications and would aferwards brake in a dead straight line from 110+ mph without a murmer. Once these systems are up and running as per factory spec they are gold standard and have no need for modification - a sentiment that funnily enough I find true for the rest of the car as well...
Regards,
Stef
Logged

1954 4th Series Aurelia B20
1965 Flaminia GT 3C 2,8
pchflyer
Member
**
Posts: 12


« Reply #22 on: 16 September, 2016, 04:38:37 PM »

I keep my Flaminia brake servo (as freshly serviced by Omicron) on a shelf in my garage!  For the last three years I have been driving around with one of these - http://www.s-v-c.co.uk/product/dual-remote-servo/ - which was easy to fit and works a treat with no hint of problems.  I had to make a couple of simple brackets which mount to the original mounting cotton reels plus one small bracket fixed to the inner wing.  Also a hydraulic switch for the brake lights was required. The whole thing is easily reversible (i.e. put back to original) with about an hour's work but I like the reassurance of knowing that when I hit the pedal, the car will stop.
While attempting to troubleshoot problem #1, stuck brakes, the car developed problem #2, a strange short at the battery, which could have been disasterous, but luckily just killed the battery and nothing else. For expediency's sake, I'm leaning toward ordering a backup servo as recommended by Charles while the original servo is sent away, if needed. I see in your pic the air valve is missing, and some lines don't appear to be connected. Is this because the photo was taken mid-installation, or did you modify it in some way?
Logged
pchflyer
Member
**
Posts: 12


« Reply #23 on: 16 September, 2016, 04:51:08 PM »

I found this excellent description of remote servo operation, complete with drawings and possible clues to servo failures: http://www.mgb-stuff.org.uk/servo.htm
Logged
Pages: 1 [2]   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Contact the Forum Administrator

LMC Forum copyright © 2007 - 2018 Lancia Motor Club Ltd

Powered by SMF 1.1.20 | SMF © 2006-2011, Simple Machines
Page created in 0.05 seconds with 21 queries.