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Author Topic: FLAVIA 2000 COUPE 1970 Fuel/Carb inlet leakage.  (Read 1621 times)
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Mike Anderson
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« on: 01 September, 2016, 06:30:12 PM »

Petrol has been leaking from the "banjo" joint where the fuel enters the carb. It appears that the fibre washers are worn and I hope to get some replacements from a local car factors. One thing puzzles me is why are there two pipes going into the carb?
Also re the fuel tank breather/vent system where all the pipes go into a plastic box on the inner rear wing by the spare wheel. What is the purpose of the box and is there anything in the box that needs cleaning?
As always any advice appreciated.
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brian
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« Reply #1 on: 01 September, 2016, 07:07:11 PM »

It is a long time since I worked on a single carb Flavia but from memory there is a return pipe back to the tank - there is I think an idea that this circulates cooler fuel and prevents/reduces vapourisation. It was a thought to fit a similar return to the Sport to help with hot restarting.
The plastic reservoir is just that and collects overflow and returns to system. I never did anything to mine but perhaps that was neglectful rather than best practice.
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Brian Hands


1922 Hands Tourer
1934 Augusta standard saloon
1938 Aprilia S1 saloon
1953 Aurelia B10
1965 Flavia Sport
Mike Anderson
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« Reply #2 on: 01 September, 2016, 08:09:22 PM »

Hi Brian thanks for your reply. Having had American 60's cars for over 30 years before the Lancia I'm more used to the agricultural engineering of the yanks. There's lots that still mystifies me about Lancias but your helpful reply has enlightened me on these points about the fuel system. Regards Mike.
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Brian Long
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« Reply #3 on: 03 September, 2016, 11:26:49 AM »

If you look closely at the connection to the carburettor, you will see that the tank return port has a smaller diameter hole in it.
 Idea was to allow circulation of fuel, and vapour bubbles, back to the tank and to maintain enough pressure to feed the fuel bowl.
Plastic tank was to collect vapours/overfill and return them back to the tank.
I have blocked the return line but have also fitted a Malpassi fuel pressure regulator which I mounted behind the battery on the mudguard. Although I had had the fuel pump rebuilt, there seemed to be some fuel starvation on overtaking, long uphill climbs, etc.
Some recent long trips to Queensland (2500km +) showed no signs of fuel starvation.
Brian.
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Mike Anderson
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« Reply #4 on: 03 September, 2016, 10:13:44 PM »

Hi Brian thanks for your reply.I did notice the smaller dia hole. The plastic tank smells of petrol and I'll check to see if any of the pipes etc are restricted/blocked preventing it from functioning correctly.I haven't noticed any fuel starvation problems although my usual trip is 30 miles max. How long have you had your Flavia are there many in Australia?
Regards Mike.
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brian
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« Reply #5 on: 04 September, 2016, 08:29:10 AM »

I am not aware of any Flavia Sports in the Antipodes and none are listed in the latest paper members list from the LMC. There are a dozen or so in UK in various states of repair. The 1500 engines did have a twin carb set up similar to the Sport.

There are a few owners of Flavias I am aware of in Australia who were members of the Flavia and 2000 Consortium - an organisation I have found invaluable over my Flat 4 years.
Brian
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Brian Hands


1922 Hands Tourer
1934 Augusta standard saloon
1938 Aprilia S1 saloon
1953 Aurelia B10
1965 Flavia Sport
Brian Long
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« Reply #6 on: 13 September, 2016, 02:20:53 AM »

Re washers at the carburettor banjo. use soft copper ones. You don't want to have a fibre one disintegrate or leak and spray petrol around whilst you are driving.
There is one Flavia Sport (Zagato) in Queensland but it is in need of a fair bit of restoration work from what I have been told.
The Australian Lancia Register has just over 30 Flavias of various types on its membership list. There are probably a few more belonging to people who are not Register members. The large majority of the Register ones are in the eastern states including two Flavia 2000 Kugelfisher injection models (820 430), one of which which had resided in Perth, W.A. until fairly recently.
One member has an 815 with an 1800 engine (815.300) and there was another 815 with Kugelfisher (815.400) in NSW years ago as I recall. One of the five Flavias that I have owned was an 819.410 with Kugelfisher. So different in performance to the 819 carburettor version.
Brian Long
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Mike Anderson
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« Reply #7 on: 14 September, 2016, 06:53:49 PM »

The repair with the fibre washers seems to be holding OK and just to be sure I spread a lot of sealing compound on the joint. I'm keeping an eye on it but will invest in some soft copper ones as you suggest just in case it needs further remedial action in the future. I think the joint had been leaking for some while as there was always a smell of petrol in the car but I could never trace the source. The smell has now gone but I'll know where to check the next time. There's a silver '70 Flavia Coupe for sale by "Mr Speedlux" who I bought my car from. It was an injection version but was converted back to single carb in Italy. It has a black leather interior. I don't think the silver looks as good a my gold which is rather striking and it seems every modern car is either grey or silver. Thanks for the info and advice, regards Mike.
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