Lancia Motor Club Forum Banner
24 May, 2022, 02:58:44 AM *
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.

Login with username, password and session length
News: Need to contact the Forum Administrator? e-mail forum.admin@lanciamc.co.uk, for Database Administrator e-mail database.admin@lanciamc.co.uk      -      Copy deadline for Viva Lancia is 12th of each month.      -      For Events e-mail events@lanciamc.co.uk      -      To Join the club go to http://www.lanciamc.co.uk/join.htm
 
   Home   Help Search Calendar Register  
Pages: [1]   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: Zagato rebuild  (Read 4689 times)
0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.
lancianut666
Permanent resident
**
Posts: 1426


Slow but rough


« on: 26 January, 2016, 11:25:55 AM »

Hi all
Had a chance to visit a consortium member who is rebuilding a Zagato for someone he knows. He has his hands full!
Clarkey


* appia stuff25o12016 065.JPG (801.1 KB, 2272x1704 - viewed 351 times.)

* appia stuff25o12016 067.JPG (834.31 KB, 2272x1704 - viewed 380 times.)
Logged

Fulvia Coupe S2 Flavia Coupe 1967 1.8 Kugelfischer Prisma 1.6 carb Y10 Fila Y10 Touring Dedra 1.8 Dedra 2.0 Turbo Appia S1
fay66
Permanent resident
**
Posts: 6048



« Reply #1 on: 26 January, 2016, 11:27:41 AM »

Lovely,
100mph without moving.

brian
*227
Logged

Own 1966 Fulvia 2C Berlina since 1997, back on road 11-1999.Known as "Fay"
2006 Renault Megane 1 5 Dci Sports Tourer
Dedra Technical Adviser
DavidLaver
Permanent resident
**
Posts: 4248



« Reply #2 on: 26 January, 2016, 01:59:20 PM »


Looks like a lot of fresh skin, much structural work as well?  Anyone know if the Appia and Flavia Zagatos have much in common in terms of construction?

Are those single tyres on the rack behind?  Must be off something special...
Logged

David Laver, Lewisham.
JohnMillham
Permanent resident
**
Posts: 1031



« Reply #3 on: 26 January, 2016, 02:23:51 PM »


Looks like a lot of fresh skin, much structural work as well?  Anyone know if the Appia and Flavia Zagatos have much in common in terms of construction
Probably best not to ask, if my Fulvia example was anything to go by.
Regards, John
Logged
lancianut666
Permanent resident
**
Posts: 1426


Slow but rough


« Reply #4 on: 26 January, 2016, 05:09:02 PM »

I like the trolley he has it on..I will have to make one
Logged

Fulvia Coupe S2 Flavia Coupe 1967 1.8 Kugelfischer Prisma 1.6 carb Y10 Fila Y10 Touring Dedra 1.8 Dedra 2.0 Turbo Appia S1
lancianut666
Permanent resident
**
Posts: 1426


Slow but rough


« Reply #5 on: 26 January, 2016, 05:11:14 PM »

another piccie


* appia stuff25o12016 066.JPG (723.33 KB, 2272x1704 - viewed 376 times.)
Logged

Fulvia Coupe S2 Flavia Coupe 1967 1.8 Kugelfischer Prisma 1.6 carb Y10 Fila Y10 Touring Dedra 1.8 Dedra 2.0 Turbo Appia S1
frankxhv773t
Permanent resident
**
Posts: 2050



« Reply #6 on: 26 January, 2016, 05:41:27 PM »

Brian, 100 mph without moving is easier with no wheels on. Less rolling resistance.
Logged
williamcorke
Megaposter
*
Posts: 597


B10


« Reply #7 on: 26 January, 2016, 11:01:27 PM »

There was a recent thread on the Alfa Giulietta 750/101 group (Yahoo) about whether to put a Sprint coupe on a rotisserie or on a stand (like the one in these photos, using - from what I can see - the suspension pick-up points). The experts' opinion was that repairing the lower body with the car on its side or inverted would lead to undesirable distortions in shape and 'incorrect' stresses.

I've had a B20 on a rotisserie for a long time, but thankfully it had retained its structural strength, so bumper mounts were more than adequate for the purpose. The next car I was planning to use the rotisserie for is a 750 Giulietta Sprint, which does need work to the sills, lower A posts and rear wheelarches. I'm now considering making a frame rather than put it on the spinner.

Does anyone have a view on this?
Logged

'37 Aprilia
'50 B10
'53 B20
'68 Flavia Vignale
'55 Giulietta Sprint
S1 Land Rover
the.cern
Permanent resident
**
Posts: 1491


« Reply #8 on: 27 January, 2016, 09:24:02 AM »

To be honest, I think that the answer is to use both!

I bought my rotisserie when I was quite advanced with the restoration of the B20. The whole of the  sills and floor, where necessary, were replaced with the car on wheel dollies. The door openings were braced and check measurements were taken before the sills were cut out to ensure that there would be no distortion. Also the bumper mountings at the front were replaced/repaired as necessary. Only then was the car put on the rotisserie to allow final repairs, cleaning off, painting etc of the floorpan the roof etc etc. Improved access allowed by the rotisserie was invaluable in helping to speed up work and allowed a really thorough job!

In hindsight I would build a frame rather than leave the car on wheel dollies as that improves access for initial repairs to get the strength and rigidity required before the rotisserie comes into play. Of one thing I am sure, the better the access to all areas of the car the better the final job will be!!

                                                        Andy
Logged
lancianut666
Permanent resident
**
Posts: 1426


Slow but rough


« Reply #9 on: 27 January, 2016, 11:43:48 AM »

Hi Andy
when you say frame do you mean the thing in my photos? I can see a rotisserie thing twisting the shell if the floors and sills are being replaced whereas using the stand/frame as in the pics the shell is clamped down and is to some extent locked to the stand as it is in this case connected to the engine mounts and the spring hangars in front of the rear axle.
Clarkey
Logged

Fulvia Coupe S2 Flavia Coupe 1967 1.8 Kugelfischer Prisma 1.6 carb Y10 Fila Y10 Touring Dedra 1.8 Dedra 2.0 Turbo Appia S1
frankxhv773t
Permanent resident
**
Posts: 2050



« Reply #10 on: 27 January, 2016, 12:12:15 PM »

I concur, use both.

The frame pictured is standard practice for bodywork repairs allowing the work to be mover around the workshop, in and out of paint booths, etc. My son's former work used one made of 8 inch "I" girders to which they would weld whatever supports are needed for a particular job. Temporary supports can be added and removed as the job dictates. However it does not allow easy access to the underside, especially for the older restorer with less mobility than in their youth. The secret to avoiding distortion is adequate bracing and frequent check measurements.

As to incorrect stresses, surely body shells are not under stress as they are being built. The purpose of the trolley/ rotisserie and bracing is to remove any load from the section being replaced and you should not remove so many bits at any one time that the remaining structure is structurally unsound.
Logged
the.cern
Permanent resident
**
Posts: 1491


« Reply #11 on: 28 January, 2016, 09:43:54 AM »

Frank, you have summed it up perfectly!

Clarkey, yes the frame is simply a support to which the shell may be attached at suitable points. The suitable points may vary, as the work progresses, as Frank points out, to provide support as appropriate to ensure no part being removed is under stress.

With regard to the frame, 8"  I beams might be more than the home restorer would normally need, but the fundamental requirement is to have a solid base onto which the vehicle specific supports may be attached. Think about how high you want the vehicle to be to work on and, of course it, the frame, must go on castors, at least two of which should be lockable. My experience also dictates that castor wheels should be steel. Nylon etc will distort making it significantly more difficult to actually move the assembly.

                                                Andy
Logged
dannels
Megaposter
*
Posts: 298



« Reply #12 on: 28 January, 2016, 09:00:12 PM »

Looks like there is very little left of zagatos work. This is probably better than it was originally...
Logged

1961 Flaminia GT, 1966 Matra Djet V
lancianut666
Permanent resident
**
Posts: 1426


Slow but rough


« Reply #13 on: 29 January, 2016, 01:35:45 PM »

I think it has had a complete new front having been in a bump and also the door bottoms and some other parts have been replaced
Clarkey
Logged

Fulvia Coupe S2 Flavia Coupe 1967 1.8 Kugelfischer Prisma 1.6 carb Y10 Fila Y10 Touring Dedra 1.8 Dedra 2.0 Turbo Appia S1
Pages: [1]   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Contact the Forum Administrator

LMC Forum copyright © 2007 - 2021 Lancia Motor Club Ltd

Powered by SMF 1.1.20 | SMF © 2006-2011, Simple Machines
Page created in 0.095 seconds with 21 queries.