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Author Topic: Brake bleeding fulvias  (Read 7028 times)
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inthedark
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« Reply #45 on: 26 November, 2007, 06:54:29 PM »

Tim,   << will there be one in 2008 >>  Yes, check Events 2008

'the colonel'
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Jai Sharma
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« Reply #46 on: 26 November, 2007, 09:19:53 PM »

Hi,
Lots of useful stuff on this subject, from people with much more experience than my own few, no make that several, days grovelling on the floor hoping to find a way to get the air out.....
But just a couple of observations, firstly I too have had a master cylinder stick with the plunger in the body. Couldn't figure out why I couldn't get fluid pumped through....
This happened on two occasions, once when it was rebuilt with new seals and one seemed perhaps a bit larger than it might have been and seemed to cause the brass piston to stick.
The second was, if I recall correctly, on a car that was sitting for a long time, and I think the inactivity meant that the piston stuck when the pedal was pressed.
I do remember pounding around Castle Combe in my first Fulvia and the car weaving quite a lot under braking. The next day there was absolutely no brake pedal - it went to the floor. The seals had failed in the master cylinder.
On the fluid subject, I have never tried silicone, partly because I thought it must inevitably get mixed unless the system happened to be apart in any case. I can see that a system with conventional fluid will take moisture in if left for years, but does anyone know over what time span it becomes significant? I understand if the fluid is changed every couple of years it is fine, but it seems to me that it should take a long time for the water to enter the system and get through the system to a position, and in a concentration, that it can cause much corrosion. I have no idea, but am curious!
Thanks
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nistri
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« Reply #47 on: 27 November, 2007, 12:14:54 PM »

New Fulvia master cylinder: I would advise inspecting it very carefully before fitting. One thing is to get the master cylinder body (with no plungers, seals etc) and it is straighforward to check it inside. A different thing is to get a fully assembled master cylinder: I have seen two (bought at swapmeets) which had been incorrectly fitted inside and produced very dodgy brakes. The best thing is to open it and check it out before fitting.
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Andrea Nistri

Ardea S2
Appia S2
Fulvia GTE
Fulvia Sport 1.3 S
Fulvia Montecarlo
Fulvia Coupe 1.3 S
lancialulu
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« Reply #48 on: 27 November, 2007, 03:08:02 PM »

Furthe to Nistri's post On the fulvia master cylinder the cross sectional drawing in the series 2 concise repair shop manual shows three conventional lipped seals. My experiance with the repair kits is you only get 2 and an o ring replacing the middle one. This may account for some funny behaviour if not assembled right.

On using silicone, I can state that I only use it on a completely rebuilt (new seals all round) refurbished system with not trace of ordinary dot 4. I would not recommend anyone "mixing" the two by just trying to bleed thro...

Tim
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Its not the winning but taking part! or is it taking apart?
1955 Aurelia B12
1967 Flavia Vignale iniezione
1967 Fulvia HFR
1972 1600 HF
1972 1600 Fulvia Sport
1978 Transformer HF3000 Strato's replica
1979 2500 Gamma Coupe
1988 Delta 1.6GTi.e.
ColinMarr
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« Reply #49 on: 27 November, 2007, 06:18:35 PM »

A cautionary tale - you donít have to driving hard in order to experience brake fluid boiling! On two occasions with the Fulvia I have experienced that heart-stopping brake pedal to the floor feeling. Both of these were when driving at low speed. The cause was the same in both instances Ė sticking rear callipers holding one of the pads on and hence overheating. It was obvious that one wheel and disc was very hot when I got out to look, but was not easily detectable while driving.

If I were to do another total rebuild of a brake system I would like to use silicone, but I would want to be reassured about the suitability of it when used with say standard Fulvia seals.

Colin   
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lancialulu
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« Reply #50 on: 27 November, 2007, 06:31:54 PM »

Interestingly my wife bless her drove my then 993 home with the handbrake on (warning light not working) at high speed/100 mile journey. Nothing detected but seriously warped rea disks afterwards - a complete rebuild. Moral - use porsche brake fluid!!

I would like to know if the replacement after market seals are made of modern/compatible materials?? I am sure they will be better than 40 years ago.

Tim

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Its not the winning but taking part! or is it taking apart?
1955 Aurelia B12
1967 Flavia Vignale iniezione
1967 Fulvia HFR
1972 1600 HF
1972 1600 Fulvia Sport
1978 Transformer HF3000 Strato's replica
1979 2500 Gamma Coupe
1988 Delta 1.6GTi.e.
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