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Author Topic: brake shoe / linings "cutting"  (Read 1102 times)
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chugga boom
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« on: 31 January, 2014, 08:38:40 PM »

as those who are on the augusta news letter have already seen, I just thought I'd post some pics of the machine used to cut Lancia brake shoes to the correct diameter for the drum, linings are generally too thick when new and should taper at the top edges of the shoe so that more surface area of the lining is in contact with the drum, anyway when we bought the last of Norman Stewarts items this machine was included, amazing bit of kit and cuts linings in seconds , as you spin the handle a cutting tool moves in towards the backplate on a screw and moves across the liner everytime you pass one revelution simple but very effective


* etch prima 013.JPG (66.37 KB, 640x480 - viewed 181 times.)

* etch prima 018.JPG (74.49 KB, 640x480 - viewed 185 times.)
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1935 augusta lusso (chugga)
1935 belna saloon
1935 augusta lusso
1938 ardenne
1939 aprilia lusso
1958 appia s2
1963 appia s3 
195? appia camioncino
1972 fulvia 1600HF
1976 fulvia coupe
194? ardea SUV  "THE BEAST!!!"
Parisien
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« Reply #1 on: 31 January, 2014, 09:03:32 PM »

Impressive, can this do any of the drum based brakes on all Lancias?

P
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Frank Gallagher
chugga boom
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« Reply #2 on: 31 January, 2014, 09:07:05 PM »

Yep  Wink it just has a different stub axle adapter for each vechicle (fronts and rears) so does aprilia Aurelia appia etc
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1935 augusta lusso (chugga)
1935 belna saloon
1935 augusta lusso
1938 ardenne
1939 aprilia lusso
1958 appia s2
1963 appia s3 
195? appia camioncino
1972 fulvia 1600HF
1976 fulvia coupe
194? ardea SUV  "THE BEAST!!!"
brian
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« Reply #3 on: 01 February, 2014, 12:05:55 PM »

I now realise just how much information is out there if one looks.
When I was rebuilding my Augusta in the 1980s through to 2000s I felt much on my own. I had the 1974 LMC Journal, occasional letters from John Turner and chats over a glass or two with Paul Atkinson.
Inter alia, the brakes were an ongoing (not literally as they grabbed and became very very hot) problem. Making the drums round helped a lot but leaking wheel cylinders were also not helping. However the grabbing did mark the linings and enable me to file off the offending bits little by little. I did the final sort by throwing away my stainless relined wheel cylinders and MC and replaced them with new 1" cylinders from JEM in Hinkley (now gone unfortunately).
I attach one of my favourite photographs taken by Karl Saenger on 2006 SPR when I was doing the usual running repairs. Note the permanently attached tow rope which was an essential part of my kit.

All tis remins me I need to change the brake fluid as I have not had to check the brakes for so long.
Brian


* SPR06.jpg (57.36 KB, 417x287 - viewed 182 times.)
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Brian Hands


1922 Hands Tourer
1934 Augusta standard saloon
1938 Aprilia S1 saloon
1953 Aurelia B10
1965 Flavia Sport
chriswgawne
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« Reply #4 on: 01 February, 2014, 03:41:40 PM »

Great photo Brian. I always gain some perverse pleasure from taking the 'low long personal-learning-curve road' as opposed to the high fast road (where other do the work). I hope you know what I mean!
I have vivid memories of you fettling your Augusta front brakes each morning and afternoon on one event way back.
Chris
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Chris Gawne
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