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Author Topic: Réplique Lancia D24 Le Mans...the forums thoughts?  (Read 1496 times)
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Parisien
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« on: 03 September, 2013, 08:44:21 PM »

http://www.leboncoin.fr/voitures/528803063.htm?ca=11_s

A mere 18K.........


P
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Frank Gallagher
sparehead3
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« Reply #1 on: 03 September, 2013, 08:49:44 PM »

... for a bodykitted triumph herald ? Wink
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Regards,
Steve Pilgrim
No.13575

1993 Delta HF integrale Evo II (Hammond's Icon - No.4)

http://www.lanciadb.co.uk/
Charles
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« Reply #2 on: 03 September, 2013, 10:00:45 PM »

Yeah, but what a bodykit!!
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Augusta berlina, Appia S3 berlina
Flaminia convertible 2.8 3c Touring
Beta spider S1 1600, Gamma berlina S1
Gamma coupe S1, Delta 1.6 multijet
the.cern
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« Reply #3 on: 04 September, 2013, 06:30:45 AM »

Two questions ...... , no make that three questions ....

1) I watched Top Gear last night, the one where Lancia is declared the greatest car marque in the world. In it Clarkson drove a Hawk Stratos replica and posed the question, repeated here ..."would you buy a car built by a man with a hammer in a shed in Nuneaton?" NB other towns are available!!!

2)  Having overlooked the above question, simply because that car looks so damn good, it is necessary to ask, what other, obviously bigger and significantly more powerful, engine may be readily slotted into a Triumph Herald chassis.

3)  I have only just thought of this one .... is that body kit still available?

                                           Andy
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Richard Fridd
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« Reply #4 on: 04 September, 2013, 07:02:54 AM »

!


* MilesCrouch-A.jpg (49.56 KB, 600x450 - viewed 184 times.)
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Richard Nevison Fridd
chugga boom
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« Reply #5 on: 04 September, 2013, 07:31:56 AM »

such a shame and waste of a body kit, ive always felt that triumph herald owners and spitfire owners either have lost the will to live or don't value their lives as much as you or I, what a dangerous load of junk both models are, terrible chassis with dangerous rear suspension and a gt6 is just pure suicide!!! , so next time you see such a said owner of 1 of these cars, put your arm around them, give them a hug, tell them that everythings gonna be ok, then give them their bus fair home to make sure they get there safely!! Cheesy Wink
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1935 augusta lusso (chugga)
1935 belna saloon
1935 augusta lusso
1938 ardenne
1939 aprilia lusso
1958 appia s2
1963 appia s3 
195? appia camioncino
1972 fulvia 1600HF
1976 fulvia coupe
194? ardea SUV  "THE BEAST!!!"
DavidLaver
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« Reply #6 on: 04 September, 2013, 11:18:07 AM »

http://www.sammio.co.uk/Pilot.aspx
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David Laver, Lewisham.
Zagato
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« Reply #7 on: 05 September, 2013, 12:03:11 AM »

You can say what you like about the old Triumphs but personally I have a soft spot for them ...
In the late 60's I experienced my first continental camping holiday to Spain ... 4 up in a Herald complete with tent, camping gear the lot ... thankfully it was an Estate. 
The following year we toured Europe again in a trusty old Herald .... camping again ... we visited France, Belgium, Luxembourg, Germany Switzerland, Austria and Italy in just two weeks ... oh and called into Spa for the Grand Prix  .... and visited Le Mans circuit as we were passing

I seem to remember the turning circle was unbelievable too ... may even have been the best ... and it certainly helped when you had wrong slotted on some continental road 

And as I recall working on the engines was a blast ... what other car allowed you to sit in comfort on the front wheel holding the light for your Dad while he carefully adjusted the tappets ...

So not all bad ... may not have been the best handling ... most sporty etc etc ....  but a very practical, affordable and reliable car as I recall

As for the Kit ... I like the style ... then again not everyone can afford the original ... so why not ... 
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chriswgawne
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« Reply #8 on: 05 September, 2013, 08:12:22 AM »

I agree. I have a large soft spot for Triumphs of the 60's and 70's as they all had a certain character (?)
In 1971 I bought a low mileage 1968 TR5 which was the most unreliable, badly built car I have ever owned. I had the head 'breathed upon' by Vulvan Engineering in W London and the extra power resulted in perpetual gearbox main shaft bearing problems and the diff mountings tearing themselves off the chassis. Not to mention new rear wings @ 2 years old due to rust and the crankshaft thrust bearings dropping out from time to time resulting in a very long clutch pedal. And the clonking from the rear driveshafts!
However I have very fond memories of it, particularly when it was running well with the roof down.
And somewhat bizarrely, it was the reason Jacky moved into my maisonette as I couldnt afford the mortgage, the TR and to live!! So 42 years later we have very happy memories of the car.
Strangely enough there are a couple of TR5s raced in the HSCC and they are not especially reliable today either!
This was followed by a VW Beetle (c/w a Jensen 541 - great truck of a car with enormous presence) and then a GT6 Mk3 for a couple of months. I never got on with the GT6 because it had no poke, it was too small and I never liked the stying much preferring the Mk2 version.
A friend of mine back then had a Triumph 2000 Estate with the Stag V8 conversion by Rimmers and that was a bit of a beast being lowered and stiffened - pity Triumph didnt have the time to develop it themselves as it would have been a real BMW and Mercedes Estate beater.
Then in 73 I realised that small powerful FWD continental engines were the way to go because of Rallying successes and we both got into Fulvia Sedans and Coupes.
Chris
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Chris Gawne
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chugga boom
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« Reply #9 on: 05 September, 2013, 04:57:27 PM »

TR 4 4A 5 &6 were good cars and in a totally different legue to heralds and spitfires, 3's and earlier had rubbish steering but were otherwise safe and ok to drive, no experience of later models however I know on a herald or spitfire especially soft tops if you push up and down on the rear corner of the rear wing the door gap on the B post opens and closes even with the door shut!!! this is due to how flimsy the chassis is , sorry they were a bad car when new and an even worse car  today, certainly not a sports car, TR4 onwards had a cracking chassis and pretty good suspension design especially when the rear drive shafts are changed to proper cv joints (on irs cars) as like aprilia's the hardy spicer couplings can lock up, back to heralds again, maybe as a car to get from A to B but pointless putting a sporty body on one,  an augusta or aprilia would absoluty wipe the floor with one on cornering, rant over  Wink Cheesy
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1935 augusta lusso (chugga)
1935 belna saloon
1935 augusta lusso
1938 ardenne
1939 aprilia lusso
1958 appia s2
1963 appia s3 
195? appia camioncino
1972 fulvia 1600HF
1976 fulvia coupe
194? ardea SUV  "THE BEAST!!!"
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