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Author Topic: A B20 Story  (Read 83509 times)
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williamcorke
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« Reply #90 on: 22 June, 2012, 11:37:54 AM »

Great stuff Andy (and Jim), thanks for posting.

Good choice on the colour front  Smiley.
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ColinMarr
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« Reply #91 on: 22 June, 2012, 05:36:45 PM »

All very impressive and I am enjoying following this too.

Just a thought, which I hope is not a worrying one – the foglight surrounds look to be circular! If you are intending to fit original Carello lights, they should be elliptical. I know of at least one B20 that had the front modified to take round Lucas spot lights, which required serious work by a subsequent owner who wanted to put it back to original. I hope I am wrong!

Keep it up,

Colin   
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neil-yaj396
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« Reply #92 on: 23 June, 2012, 01:55:26 PM »

Andy

What a project! Think of the thrill when it hits the road. You're so lucky to have the time, space and help.
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« Reply #93 on: 23 June, 2012, 08:37:10 PM »

All very impressive and I am enjoying following this too.

All very impressive and I am enjoying following this too.

Just a thought, which I hope is not a worrying one – the foglight surrounds look to be circular! If you are intending to fit original Carello lights, they should be elliptical. I know of at least one B20 that had the front modified to take round Lucas spot lights, which required serious work by a subsequent owner who wanted to put it back to original. I hope I am wrong!

Keep it up,

Colin   


Hope this quote thing works !!!!!!!!

Colin, not a worry at all. They were elliptical when Jim started on them and if they are circular now ....... I'll kill him ... slowly !!!!  Seriously, I think it's simply my rubbish photography and unfortunate angle of shot, they are definitely elliptical. I can see that it would be a huge amount of effort to have to re-fabricate and locate them accurately had they been changed.

The previous owner had bodged quite  a bit, which is forgiveable, what I am struggling with is his decision to throw out the front seats and replace them with Cortina units, that is not forgiveable !!!!

So, if anyone has seats for a 4th series B20, please please get in touch!!!!

                              Andy
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« Reply #94 on: 23 June, 2012, 09:47:19 PM »

Andy, That’s a relief!

Just to show that it can happen – here’s a photo of a part restored 4th Series B20 that had been expertly modified years earlier to take Lucas round spot-lights and ‘hooded’ Lucas headlamps. Such things were done when B20s cost peanuts and few people cared about originality. Nothing to do with me guvnor!

The car went back to Italy in pieces and was rebuilt back to original spec. Sorry, but the seats went with it!

Colin


* B20 1990.jpg (179.02 KB, 886x533 - viewed 240 times.)
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the.cern
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« Reply #95 on: 26 August, 2012, 07:24:19 AM »

OK, I give up .......... how does the dynamo come off a B20 engine (without using a big hammer !!!).

I decided the time has come to try to pick off some of the peripheral bits. The dynamo and starter are the first to get this treatment because the excellent auto electric whizz that I found has announced his retirement, bloody inconsiderate if you ask me !!! Seriously, he did a magnificent job rebuilding the starter from the Appia and he is retiring, but has said he will continue to 'potter in a little workshop at home' rebuilding components etc. Carpe diem comes to mind .. hence the need to remove the dynamo.

I have removed the pulley and undone the near vertical hollow bolt through the engine casting on the left side of the dynamo which leaves a 3 or 4mm dia pin projecting from the bolt hole. This pin appears immoveable, at least without using a large hammer and I'm not that desperate ........ yet !!  I then squirted copious amounts of Plus Gas along the interface of the engine casting and dynamo body and, using a piece of wood as a drift, I tapped the screw eye on the underside of the dynamo body to try to rotate the whole in the engine casting. It was only a small hammer and I did not hit it hard as I was acting in ignorance !!!!!  Not unusual !!! Absolutely nothing.

So, the time has come to seek advice, I do not want to act in haste and damage something when, I am sure, there many many people out there who would be able to do this little job in their sleep.  Help please ..

                                     Andy
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« Reply #96 on: 27 August, 2012, 12:50:33 PM »

Andy, attached is a photo of the locking nut and the wedge that it holds in place. You need to loosen the wedge, then the dynamo should rotate and you will be able to withdraw the dynamo from the engine casing. Of course it will be all seized up!!!  good luck!


* 004 - Copy (3).JPG (79.81 KB, 1334x506 - viewed 185 times.)
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« Reply #97 on: 27 August, 2012, 01:17:02 PM »

Thank you for this and the photo is invaluable.

The hole has been full of Plus Gas for 3 days now and I have tried to move the pin, a bit of waggling and try to rotate it but to no avail so far. Perseverance is required !!! I will try again.

                           Andy

                     

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« Reply #98 on: 27 August, 2012, 09:41:34 PM »

I just love this Forum, without it I would have given up years ago !!!!!

Well Ade, having seen the size and shape of the pin/wedge to  be removed I went back today armed with fresh resolve. Of course my attempts to rotate the pin/wedge had been a waste of time and effort, it cannot rotate and a straight lift is the only solution. Thank goodness your photo shows the hole at the top of the pin, it was to be the focus of my attack. I had not realised there was a hole, the one in mine was totally clogged with a sheared split pin and grease

So, the  plan .... put lifting pin through hole, lever against pin, lift out pin/wedge !!! Simples !!

Turn of events... squirt Plus Gas everywhere, again.
                        find hole and clean it out
                        find nail that fits the hole to use as lifting pin
                        find something to use as lever, inspiration, long nose pliers, tapered shape allows snug fit, good lever arm, equal load to both sides of nail.
                        find pliers, position, apply load, shear nail .... oh dear
                        find drill bit that fits hole
                        position pliers, apply load AND OUT COMES THE PIN/WEDGE

An absolute dream !!! Time taken from start to shearing nail, about 45mins. Time taken from finding drill bit to extracting pin/wedge, about 3mins. Of course the dynamo then slides out to the rear without any problem. NB the pulley had previously been removed.

So now its off to friendly auto electrician to have it and the starter motor checked and repaired as necessary.

Once again Ade, thank you for your post that made the task so simple.

Best wishes,

                Andy

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« Reply #99 on: 29 August, 2012, 08:36:44 AM »


Hooray!!

David
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« Reply #100 on: 02 September, 2012, 12:01:39 PM »

Jim's comment, why not put the hollow nut back on, put in the drill bit and then undo the hollow nut? That will lift it out smoothly. He's knows too much that man !!!!  Of course, that would have been a better and more controlled way of doing it. I just hope that I will not need to remove a dynamo again, but if I do ..........

                       Andy
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« Reply #101 on: 02 September, 2012, 09:00:55 PM »

It has all been a matter of bits and pieces of late. The rear springs have been re-assembled and require only the clamp rivets and their  spacers before being totally  complete.

This brought the rest of the rear axle to the forefront, off came the Panhard rod and, no surprise the Silentbloc bushes are completely shot. Another trawl on the internet revealed a company called Robush which carries a huge range of Silentbloc bushes. They listed some that had the correct ID and OD but were too long, another little job for Jim and his lathe !!!!  The great news was, £5 each plus £5 P&P. I thought that was good. They have arrived and are with Jim to allow him to make the removal/insertion tool.

Next to receive attention, hub assemblies. One side at a time so there was always a complete unit to view for re-assembly. Two special tools are required to allow the bearing securing rings to be removed, but I decided to try the good old hammer and drift method. Using an alloy drift ensured minimal damage to the rings. First attempt on the left side inner ring was futile. A look at the parts book (thank you Huib) revealed that the spring circlips that lock the inner rings are handed, thus a reasonable assumption that the thread on the rings are handed. Left hand side, left hand thread, armed with that knowledge another attempt and off came the ring without any trouble at all. Now the outer ring, check the parts book, both circlips are the same, off came the outer ring with the same hammer and drift. However, it was still trapped between the bearing and the hub. Now to remove the bearing!!! Jim (good ol' Jim) had made a bearing splitter/removal tool that was just big enough to deal with these big boys. The bearing came off in several pieces, not what I had expected, but without damage and was subsequently re-assembled. The inside lip of the oil seal was hard and cracked whilst the bearing itself, which had felt rough and damaged, on re-assembly, ran and felt as smooth as new. Notwithstanding that, it will be replaced, after all, the car has stood without moving for so long that some damage to the wheel bearings is inevitable.

We decided, even at this stage, to make the special tools to deal with the inner and outer rings, although one side had been successfully dismantled there still remained the right hand side to dismantle and final re-assembly of both sides. A 'C' spanner has been made to deal with the outer ring,  but the ring is so tight it has, to date, resisted all my efforts, even with a 1m extension tube to increase the leverage. Tomorrow will see the heat and shock treatment. Hopefully Jim will find the time to make the tool for the inner ring ring over the coming week  and by this time next week the hub will be totally disassembled.

So, the question now is, where can I buy new bearings and oil  seals Huh?

An update soon I hope.

                                 Andy
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Parisien
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« Reply #102 on: 02 September, 2012, 09:17:32 PM »

http://www.oldlanciaspares.com/aurelia_eng/trasmissione.php

Rear bearings


Ask about the seals....


P

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« Reply #103 on: 03 September, 2012, 08:14:32 AM »



This brought the rest of the rear axle to the forefront, off came the Panhard rod and, no surprise the Silentbloc bushes are completely shot. Another trawl on the internet revealed a company called Robush which carries a huge range of Silentbloc bushes. They listed some that had the correct ID and OD but were too long, another little job for Jim and his lathe !!!!  The great news was, £5 each plus £5 P&P. I thought that was good. They have arrived and are with Jim to allow him to make the removal/insertion tool.


What size should they be? I have a few odd ones - and you never know, I could have the correct ones. The new ones I bought for the Augusta steering are mad of much "stiffer" rubber than old ones, which make the steering heavier, as they don't allow as much rotation as is really required. I'm thinking of having some softer rubber ones made. Hills Rubber Company in Reading will probably make them.
 Regards, John
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« Reply #104 on: 03 September, 2012, 11:28:44 AM »

This page of Lancia bearings from my old 1959 SKF catalogue might be of some help. Lists the modern SKF bearing numbers, were there is an equivalent, which you can probably get locally.
Noel


* SKF cat.jpg (422.99 KB, 1061x1503 - viewed 224 times.)
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