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Author Topic: Lambda....the journey begins!  (Read 2593 times)
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Dikappa
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« Reply #45 on: 14 January, 2020, 07:17:55 PM »

Ha Simon, I know the feeling, and the other half was scratching underbody coating of and out Beta wheel arches and off undersides.....

Ok the machines...I used two to get the gearbox housing clean:

First the RVS unpainted one on the right, this is an Italian made High pressure parts washer.  I used one briefly at an engine shop a couple off years ago and was very impressed.  It uses 80bar pressure, warm (50C) water and soap solution.  The soap is deliverd by the suplier of the machine.  It gets of quit a lot of dirt, but like in case off the very polluted gearbox not everything.  Big advantage is that you use water ans soap, and that since I installed an oil water separator on the sewage of the workshop, the used water can go down the drain...it became more and more difficult to get rid of used degreasing agents, which was one of the reasons I bought this machine.  The biggest disadvantage is that the water needs to get hot.  It contains 90 liters of water, and the greedy Italians installed a 2700 Watt heating element in the machine. (like a domestic thee water heater....)  This then takes about forever to heat up....the suplier commented that it should be left on day and night, which is maybe ok if one uses it daily, but if used, like here once every two weeks or so it would be very uneconomical.  So a couple of weeks ago I installed a home made 12Kw heater and a circulation pump (heater is an long 3Fase resistor installed in a 2" piece of Pipe) and now it gets to 50 in 20 minutes...warranty is now void....

The green machine on the left is a dutch built Henkel wet blasting cabinet.  It uses a mixture of glass beads (same as for dry blasting) and water. This is what gives the aluminium the beautiful finish.  It constantly stirrs the mixture by blowing compressed air in it, and an air driven membrane pump pumps the mixture to the gun, where the mixture is accelerated using more compressed air.  (big compressor needed...)
The cabinet is also completely in RVS and these things really cost a fortune new, but my constantly keeping an eye out on used equipment sites payed of and I got it for very reasonable money.
The disadvantage is one needs to rinse off very very carfully after the wet blasting as one does not want glass beads in an engine....hence I'm now preparing the aurelia block by making plates to completely close the block and will blast it only on the outside, to avoid getting glass into any oil channels.
The advantage over dry blasting with glass is that in the wet machine one closes the pores (is that a good word?) instead of opining them up, and dirty fingers will wipe of easy on wet blasted alu...
But it looks soo clean that is seems the parts are painted with silver paint...

Some pics below of the both of them, and some of the alu parts to be welded to the brake pulley boxes....


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« Last Edit: 18 January, 2020, 09:32:00 PM by Dikappa » Logged
Dikappa
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« Reply #46 on: 18 January, 2020, 09:37:28 PM »

I received a video today of the engine running, it is ready for pickup so we'll visit Turin in a week or so!
Can't post the video here sadly.
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Dikappa
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« Reply #47 on: 26 January, 2020, 05:45:40 PM »

Finally last week I got the tubes to finish the seat frames.  As it proved difficult to get the shape of the backrest as I wanted it, and even more difficult to mirror it for the other side, I decided to invest the time and make a 'reversable' wooden buck.  It took half a day to make the mold, then 10 minutes per side to bend the tubes around it....but it proved a good investment as finally I got the shape I had in mind...
It took a lot of fitting and re-fitting the seats in the car, as I did not want to do the welding in the car, but it's the end result that counts!
I now also came to the conclusion that when finished the gearstick will need to come out before the seats can go in or out...

Now only need to weld in some little brackets to attach an aluminium plate in the backrests, then they are ready to be painted.

Also last week a friend came to help with soldering new messing mesh to the oil filler tube filters, this needed a massive 200 Watt soldering Iron and a lot of skill, not my cup of tea!  Result very nice, small things but they need to get done.

Wednesday it's of to Turin to fetch the engine, so will post some pics of that next weekend...


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frankxhv773t
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« Reply #48 on: 27 January, 2020, 02:13:31 PM »

Your friend has mastered the art of soldering the perfect heat sink!
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Dikappa
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« Reply #49 on: 27 January, 2020, 05:53:31 PM »

It's maybe good to mention here:  We used standard available cupper water pipe of 35mm and 22mm for the outer and inner filter respectivelyas a 'mould' .  Now the soldering guy wanted alu pipe, as the solder would not catch on the pipe.  This was not available in the DIY shop, but the guy in the shop came up with the brilliant idea to stick a piece of Aluminium self adhesive tape on cupper pipe where the soldering had to be done.  It worked a treat!
The soldering in itself is all about knowing which products to use....will make notes next time!
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Dikappa
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« Reply #50 on: 06 February, 2020, 06:35:52 PM »

Major steps, luckily in the forward direction.  Visit to Turin brought the engine home, seeing it running before loading was very nice!  In addition to that came a heard of usefull tips from Guido, who built it.
 
In Turin we had a very well filled program, with visits to automotoretro, FCA Heritage hub, and the opening of the aurelia exhibition at Mauto (formerly the Biscaretti).  I must say Mauto was really the best car museum ever, and much much nicer than it was before.  They really did a great job on renewing the museum.  (must admit that the centenario in 2006 was the last time I visited)
However the FCA heritage hub was the ultimate high for me....I hope it will soon be opened for the public, as this collection being available but not accessible is simply a crime IMO.

But back to the Lambda: Another unexpected treat was finding a surplus stock of 'real' Lambda leather, I think the colour matches the colour of the car well enough, and the deal was quickly struck, another problem struck from the list.

And today my soldering and welding genius friend came to the resque again, and TIG welded the crack in the gearbox cover, and repaired the front brake pulley housings.  The crack turned out to be multiple, and much longer then could be seen.  By simply pre-heating it with the TIG, it became very visible. 
And on welding it, I learned that my very clean looking gearbox housing was far from clean, it is simply unbelievable how much oily dirt came sweating out of the aluminium when hot....


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JohnMillham
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« Reply #51 on: 06 February, 2020, 08:15:41 PM »

First time I have seen a photo of the engine. It looks like a 9th. series, judging by the magneto-less dynamo. Is it held on with just one strap?
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Dikappa
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« Reply #52 on: 07 February, 2020, 06:21:44 AM »

Hi John,

Indeed the dynamo is a ninth series.  It came with the car and was fully overhauled already, so I think I'll use that one for now.  But in the meantime I found a correct 8th series magneto, a project for the future.
The dynamo us much shorter so one strap only (off course the attachments for the secand strap are there.  It might be an advantage as the ignition is now a bit further away from the exhaust heat...
« Last Edit: 07 February, 2020, 06:25:06 AM by Dikappa » Logged
Dikappa
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« Reply #53 on: 16 February, 2020, 07:39:44 PM »

quite a bit of time for the Lambda this week, but then one discovers how time consuming the 'small works' are in reality.  Saved some threads, cleaned more gearbox parts, and prepared parts for blasting and painting.
As I decided to use Standox 2K spraycans (which have limited life after they have been mixed) I have to prepare a batch, then blast and primer.

I will try to get on with steering and pedals, as I would like to have these in place first, to better asses seating position.

Gearbox parts are a real pain to get clean, the stuff attached to al internal parts is incredibly sticky, making it very hard to remove...



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