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Author Topic: Y10 GTie (LHD)  (Read 5606 times)
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Duncan23
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« Reply #90 on: 21 January, 2021, 09:46:17 AM »

Yeah, taking the seat out so I could lie on my back and look under the dash did occur to me. I have some carpet dye lying around from when I did the 924 carpet, so if I was feeling ambitious I could take the other seat and the centre console out and make the carpet black again. I should really stick to one project at a time!
Your picture of the back of the dash is really useful, but I don't know how much of a mirror it is being LHD.
I'll check out Kevin's thread (again - I tend to get lost in there admiring it all!).
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Duncan23
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« Reply #91 on: 23 January, 2021, 05:36:22 PM »

Well, there's good news and there's bad news.
The first thing I did was label the stereo wires and then cut them. Hopefully that will mean I can find them, reverse engineer what they are from the back of the stereo and then splice them into a generic block connector. Then I removed (well broke) the last clip on the heater cables and pulled them all through.
Finally it was time to actually start moving the dash.
I started off following the instructions, trying to disconnect all the connectors.  There were about 6 that connected the loom that was part of the dash to the column, and I could actually reach these ones so I disconnected them. That meant that the dash could move a bit more, and I realised that there were loads hiding behind the dash. Given how much of a struggle doing them when I could see them, and where I could actually get tools on them, I didn't fancy my chances of disconnecting the hundreds that were lurking out of reach under the dash and behind a bunch of other cabling.
So I took the easy way out, cut the 3 cable ties that connected the dash loom to the dash, and just yanked the dash off the loom, leaving that still in the car. After much effort and swearing, the dash moved off the loom and appeared to be free. I almost got the whole thing out, but there were some (more) random attachments that I've no idea what they are holding it fast. Once I'd removed the random panel holding them, I could finally try to get it out of the car.  There were several times during this process I thought it was going to break in half, but miraculously it didn't.  So before I start the jigsaw puzzle of putting the broken shards of dashboard left in my footwell back into the dash, here's what came out.
The central piece is almost entirely disconnected from the main bit that passes across the car, the whole section around the steering column is cracked to hell (possibly from resting on the steering column where I fought everything else), there are loads of missing points where there should be mounts for screws, and there is a giant crack running across the top just in front of the driver. Aside from that, it's not too bad! Wink

I need to get hold of some epoxy and CSM and start putting some strength back into it - once I'm happy it won't fall apart in my hands I'll have to start working out how to add all the mounting points back in so that you can attach the clocks, heating etc sturdily. I'm guessing that's going to take a little while templating up bits of steel (in some cases working out how to add the mounting holes back onto the heating stuff too). After that's done, I guess it will be time for the flocking!
I also need to disconnect all the bits of that loom, clean all the connectors so you can push them together and take them apart without enormous force.

Once I've done all that, I can consider re-uniting the dash and the loom and putting it back in the car - don't think I'll be driving it for a little while!


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Kevinlincs
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« Reply #92 on: 23 January, 2021, 06:00:46 PM »

Certainly got some damaged bits to repair there, they are a fairly flimsy dash being of the brittle plastic variety without any metal reinforcing backbone so bound to be a bit fragile.
It's a challenge you've set yourself but attacking each area in turn rather than looking at the whole will see you the best chance of a decent outcome. Araldite used to be a good strong two part epoxy, not sure if it's a brand still in circulation as last time I tried to buy some I couldn't find any so bought some Gorilla glue in a strikingly similar package which made me wonder about if it had re-branded, suspicion growing when using the glue that it had the same smell as Araldite and behaved the same.
When I repaired mine I made up some metal pieces to brace the cracks and used self tapper screws to dig into the plastic, this combined with the epoxy under and over the metal will make for a strong repair.

When my dash came out I left all the wires attached to the back of the dash rather than try and unclip them all, but then I also had the luxury of the whole engine bay wiring loom ready to pull through too so I can't see that being too much of an option. Maybe you could pull the loom through a bit and lay the dash sideways in the floor to enable the wiring to be clipped back into place?
Often though it can be best to just reverse the removal process to prevent confusion.
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frankxhv773t
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« Reply #93 on: 23 January, 2021, 07:20:52 PM »

I saw a thing advertised the other day for mending broken plastic like this.

It was like a twin soldering iron with little wire squiggles that went between the two arms. The wire heated up and melted across the crack, joining and reinforcing it, then the ends going into the iron snapped off like pop rivet ends.

This is the sort of thing though I expect they can be found cheaper.

https://www.frost.co.uk/eastwood-hot-stapler-plastic-repair-system/?gclid=CjwKCAiAr6-ABhAfEiwADO4sfd-Xv8tcfZyREyMPvDqt74jEeQua3-Z056F5gEu5wl0YQV_7k8c3EhoC-a4QAvD_BwE

It would be a case of balancing the cost including time against getting a second hand dash from Europe.

Failing that I think the plastic welding cements for repairing bumpers might be a better way forward than araldite which I have found to crack when flexed.

I'm not convinced about flocking on a Y10 but it sounds like it's something you are keen to try. It's hard to resist when you have a cunning plan like that!

 
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Duncan23
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« Reply #94 on: 23 January, 2021, 08:07:42 PM »

The plastic welding stuff looks interesting.
I figured it would need a second layer of something behind it (steel where we need screws, fibreglass elsewhere). I'll need to use a different material to bridge the gaps anyway. How much does it need to flex?

I think that unless I cover it in something it will just look like it has been shoddily repaired. Hence the flocking idea.
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Kevinlincs
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« Reply #95 on: 23 January, 2021, 10:41:02 PM »

Flexing is an issue as Frank says, maybe an epoxy like araldite might not be suitable.
Similarly fibreglass would be difficult to get good adherence to the plastic and would peel off when flexed.
With the movement of the car, heat and cooling of the plastic is enough to cause issues.
Plastic weld repair kit looks interesting.
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frankxhv773t
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« Reply #96 on: 24 January, 2021, 01:22:17 PM »

It's not so much a case of it needing to flex as the fact that it is liable to flex as you put it in and out. I have used araldite to repair the arms of the radio cover and found a tendency for it to crack at the point where the arms broke on the first place. It just makes me a bit cautious about what I expect of araldite.

One idea I have had is, once the surface of the dash is fastened back together, inserting reinforcement in the recesses at the back then filling it all with expanding foam.
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lancialulu
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« Reply #97 on: 24 January, 2021, 02:39:01 PM »

Could you use PE seam sealer taping over the crack. That product is strong and flexible and black. Just an idea
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Its not the winning but taking part! or is it taking apart?
1955 Aurelia B12
1967 Flavia Vignale iniezione
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1972 Fulvia 1600HF
1972 Fulvia 1600HF
1972 1600 Fulvia Sport
1979 2500 Gamma Coupe
1988 Delta 1.6GTi
1998 Zeta
Duncan23
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« Reply #98 on: 24 January, 2021, 04:26:29 PM »

I have ordered a cheap plastic welder from Amazon. Will have a go with it next weekend... I'll still need to bond some brackets in so I can attach everything else (I'll use screws as well where the back of the panel is hidden). I've got some of those U clips so as I can make reasonable sized holes in the brackets and have some adjustment to line everything up - hopefully that should make re-assembly easier (and longer lasting).

To make refitting the dash easier I'm gonna remove the centre console. That and the steering column are the only bits that really get in the way (and I've not looked into how complicated removing the steering column yet).
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Kevinlincs
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« Reply #99 on: 24 January, 2021, 05:58:43 PM »

Steering column is very simple to remove, or just lower down.
You probably already have the cowling covers off around the control levers, if not that's just a few screws.
The column itself is held on at 4 places, two 10mm socket sized bolts at the lower end and two 13mm socket sized nuts at the top.
You can either just lay it on the floor like that or first off remove the nut and bolt holding the column to the steering rack at the pinch clamp near the floor, you can then pull the whole column out of the car but it's worth marking the position so you get it back on the same spline.
All the connections for the control levers are different to each other either in number of wires or colours of wire so will only logically go back in one way but I guess you've already got them undone.

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Duncan23
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« Reply #100 on: 25 January, 2021, 10:10:23 AM »

The cowling cover is off. In theory it should be 3 screws, but 2 of them are spinning in broken plastic, so it only needed one to remove it. About par for the course for this car!
If it's that simple then I'll drop the column before I put the dash back in - the easier I can make it the better. Wink
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lancianut666
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Slow but rough


« Reply #101 on: 25 January, 2021, 10:25:54 AM »

You deserve a medal for attempting this major repair of the dashboard...I would be trawling Ebay.It for a LHD dash
Clarkey
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Fulvia Coupe S2 Flavia Coupe 1967 1.8 Kugelfischer Prisma 1.6 carb Y10 Fila Y10 Touring Dedra 1.8 Dedra 2.0 Turbo Appia S1
frankxhv773t
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« Reply #102 on: 25 January, 2021, 12:10:31 PM »

If the steering column cowl is the same as RHD I have got one that the screws don't spin in if you need it.

I'm pretty sure all the wiring connector blocks are unique so it is impossible to put the wrong ones together.
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Duncan23
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« Reply #103 on: 27 January, 2021, 11:59:10 AM »

The plastic weld tool arrived yesterday. I'm hoping to get half an hour to experiment with it this evening. I don't have any items of similar thickness/brittleness of plastic to experiment on, so I might just pick a couple of inconspicuous bits and give it a go. I think I'll start with the steering column shroud, because I'm pretty sure that the LHD and RHD are the same so I can replace it if I mess it up!
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DavidLaver
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« Reply #104 on: 27 January, 2021, 03:10:06 PM »

I stumbled on this guy for aluminium "welding" using the low temp sticks and a blow torch, and he makes good use of that on non critical items, bits of body work for a custom bike.  He's also great on getting started with a low cost wheeling machine which encouraged me to buy one for my godson who's done well with it.

His plastic welding has 2.3 million views which is pretty good for someone with an english accent.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gRCMIDILfEI

....and from nine years ago:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=61iyLarL258
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=k7GRNvPSf7k

« Last Edit: 27 January, 2021, 03:16:56 PM by DavidLaver » Logged

David Laver, Lewisham.
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