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Author Topic: Y10 FIRE LX  (Read 5606 times)
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Kevinlincs
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« Reply #105 on: 03 July, 2020, 08:58:22 PM »

Well impressed I want one of those tilter things! where did you get it from?
Typical Lancia behaviour the Y10 not wanting to stay where you want it... 
Clarkey

Bought mine from here years ago, it's been chopped about a few times as I originally bought it to use on an AlfaSud, it did 2 or 3 then altered it to suit my integrale, now the Y10!

http://www.mk2mania.com/
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Kevinlincs
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« Reply #106 on: 04 July, 2020, 10:24:00 PM »

Managed to get a little time on the car this afternoon, came up with a solution that allows me multiple positions to secure the car at, all the angles I'll be needing to get the sills and floors done.

Once that was sorted the time came to start chopping out the original sill, always a feeling of trepidation with the point of no return looming but has to be done.
To get the old sill off the door step join I drill through just the outer skin taking care not to go through the inner piece so I've enough material left over that's not full of holes!
Then make a slit either side of the spot welds and the little tags can be easily twisted off, no distortion and no chiselling or hammering.


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Kevinlincs
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« Reply #107 on: 04 July, 2020, 10:30:41 PM »

Manged to get a decent fit along the door gap, temporarily with clamps for now as I will need to make the bottom edge first but I need to have the fit right on the step and door gap first, no point in creating a solid bottom lip to the floor if that means the sill is crooked or doesn't fit the door correctly.


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Kevinlincs
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« Reply #108 on: 04 July, 2020, 10:32:50 PM »

New sill also comes with the swage line for the rear quarter which is nice, means you can join higher up the quarter panel and not have to create a fiddly groove.
Really impressed with the quality of the sills especially for the money.


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Kevinlincs
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« Reply #109 on: 04 July, 2020, 10:36:40 PM »

As I say though, a bit of fresh air to fill in on the floor side but now I know where I need to build to it will make life simpler. Being able to do that work with the car upside down and not with me laid underneath will be almost a pleasure...
Back to work next week so that'll hold up progress. Been spoilt the last few weeks on furlough, but it allowed me to finish the alfasud and get a start on the Y10 ahead of schedule, didn't expect to be able to get started until the autumn.


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DavidLaver
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« Reply #110 on: 05 July, 2020, 04:14:18 PM »


I like that "slot and twist" technique.
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David Laver, Lewisham.
lancianut666
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Slow but rough


« Reply #111 on: 06 July, 2020, 06:12:59 AM »

Most informative...I see what you mean about the fit and quality of the new sills and why it makes sense to cut the old one right off.
Clarkey
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Fulvia Coupe S2 Flavia Coupe 1967 1.8 Kugelfischer Prisma 1.6 carb Y10 Fila Y10 Touring Dedra 1.8 Dedra 2.0 Turbo Appia S1
frankxhv773t
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« Reply #112 on: 06 July, 2020, 10:22:32 AM »

Do you have pictures of the old sills showing the extent of rot? It would be interesting to see where the rot is and how far it goes. I have generally found the problems relate to the seam where they attach to the floor but haven't removed one to see what else might be going on behind the scenes. The perennial problem with Y10s is improper jacking that bends this seam, breaking the underseal and admitting water in the vulnerable area behind the nearside front wheel. It means the problem is as much in the perimeter of the floor as in the bottom of the sill.
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Kevinlincs
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« Reply #113 on: 06 July, 2020, 07:26:41 PM »

The technique for removing a row of spot welds is one I've used for some time having tried numerous different ways, breaking it down into individual little sections allows for the spot welds to be removed with absolutely minimal risk of damage to the remaining flange, unlike when using an air chisel or a hammer and chisel, the pieces twist off very easily and without distorting the flange.

The old sill was generally in good order, the rot was restricted pretty much to within a few inches of the lower seam as Frank suggests.
I did consider leaving most of the original on the car and cutting what I needed from the new sill but that means you have a joint to tidy up, using it all up to the door seal means your welding is on the flange that's then covered by the seal and you get a nice fresh door step.
The other issue was a hole in the top edge about where the front corner of the door sits.

With the new sills it pays to balance out how much of the panel you use and how much original car you leave on, nothing in the rules says you have to use the whole sill. I cut a good couple of inches off where it goes behind the front wing as it keeps the joint lower down away from the door hinge and it being completely rot free there was no point in going higher, a joint was needed wherever it may be so just make it where best suits.

I have kept the main section of removed sill so it can be given to the paint suppliers to get a colour match as there are a few shades of the blue available, even though I'll be spraying the whole car and probably the engine bay too I'll try and match the correct shade. I'll take a snap of the inner side of the panel next time if needed.


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« Last Edit: 06 July, 2020, 07:31:29 PM by Kevinlincs » Logged
fay66
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« Reply #114 on: 08 July, 2020, 06:45:20 PM »

James, have you tried a zip cutter for cutting out the spot welds?
Brian
8227  Shocked
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Own 1966 Fulvia 2C Berlina since 1997, back on road 11-1999.Known as "Fay"
1999 Suzuki Wagon R+ GL, now my daughters
2006 Renault Megane 1 5 Dci Sports Tourer
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Kevinlincs
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« Reply #115 on: 12 July, 2020, 09:59:19 PM »

I've been sorting through a few parts today getting an order ready. One thing I'd always planned on doing was replacing all the brake components especially the hydraulics as the pedal was awful so a full go through was in order.
One thing that can get overlooked is the rubber flexible hoses. They have a habit of collapsing internally which restricts the flow, in worst cases they cause the brakes to bind on. The hole where fluid is supposed to be able to travel through gets very restricted especially around any clips, check out the virtual pinhole that was on the front one when I cut it open, so restricted that the fluid inside the flexi wouldn't even flow out! That has the effect of holding the brakes on slightly. I'll be replacing everything on the hydraulic system..

Also I did a bit of cleaning parts using the electrolysis method. Even brings up the rusted cast iron caliper brackets like new. Did a few bits and pieces, cleaned and sprayed with red oxide for now. Once I get them all done I'll paint with 2K jet black paint, did consider getting bits powder coated but as there ended up being well over 20 pieces I thought a bit of elbow grease would keep the expenditure down, and gives something to do in the shed.


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frankxhv773t
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« Reply #116 on: 12 July, 2020, 11:04:34 PM »

A timely warning about brake flexi hoses. I replaced all mine just before lockdown and haven't had the chance to try them to see the improvement yet.

Could you give more detail on your electrolysis de rusting. Are you using a battery charger and washing soda?
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Kevinlincs
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« Reply #117 on: 13 July, 2020, 09:13:43 PM »

The electrolysis process is pretty simple and doesn't require a big expensive outlay unlike setting up a grit blasting cabinet which needs a very good compressor with a high cfm flow to keep it fed.
All that's needed is a tub, some angle iron, bits of cable and a standard battery charger.
This is my small set up which has done numerous bits over the last few years. Especially handy on delicate parts that a blaster could easily damage. Also it's only the rust that comes off so unlike a grinder that also takes good metal you take off the bare minimum leaving only good metal.

The bucket has 4 pieces of old angle, dexion shelving brackets in this case, which are screwed to the sides vertically and fairly evenly spaced, number isn't overly important I don't think but this seems the average. You then link all the tops together in a circle.
Attach the battery charger positive lead to the circle of cables and suspend the piece to be cleaned with the negative terminal attached but out of the water. Best to use a wooden or plastic pole to rest it off as you don't want it to touch the angle irons and short circuit things!


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DavidLaver
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« Reply #118 on: 13 July, 2020, 09:18:04 PM »


Child's play:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sIAi1M9X8s8
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David Laver, Lewisham.
Kevinlincs
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« Reply #119 on: 13 July, 2020, 09:20:19 PM »

I read that soda crystals are the best to use in the water which I tried first and worked OK, then when I wanted to use it again I tried it with Daz washing powder which I feel works just as well and is always to hand, Mrs frowns when I kee taking a scoop down to the shed though!
Bonus is it makes the shed smell of fresh laundry as the water warms up and froths up!

Today I took the bottom ball joints out of the hubs so I could get the rust off and paint them. I'll be fitting new joints back in so I don't have to go back to the job in years to come.

One I'd taken  wire brush to to see how good it comes up with a little scrubbing alone, very poor result and getting in the corners is near impossible.


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