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Author Topic: Lambda....the journey begins!  (Read 10041 times)
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Dikappa
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« Reply #30 on: 01 December, 2019, 08:13:23 PM »

Not much to report, but some small jobs done such as fabrication of swivel points for the accelerator pedal, and some dismanteling of the two small fuel and oil tanks to prepare them for blasting.  I also took appart the steering colum for cleaning and preparation, and found the bearing inside the bearing carrier broken.  Very odd as one would think this bearing has an easy live...maybe it has something to do with how it was removed from the car at the time...

Is there any knowledge here on the forum regarding the Nivex l'exhausteur vacuum operated fuel system?  Is this wise to try and use this still or is an electric fuel pump hidden in the back a better proposition?
I have a dismanteled unit here (which involves desoldering the housing), and noticed a cork float is used inside, and fear the coating might not be very resitant to fuels containing ethanol...

Seats are a bit on hold as the laser company has not made the necessary parts yet.
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davidwheeler
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« Reply #31 on: 02 December, 2019, 12:57:31 PM »

I have rebuilt both my Le Nivex pumps using an SU float and found them very reliable.     The split pins holding the various levers in place tend to break if you take them apart but if the only problem is the float then all the rest may be left untouched.     I have just posted the details on the Technical Information thread.
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David Wheeler.  Lambdas, Aprilia, Fulvia Sport.(formerly Appia and Thema as well).
Dikappa
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« Reply #32 on: 03 December, 2019, 08:33:10 PM »

Hi David,  thanks for the posts, interesting read.  Regarding the floats I was alredy thinking along that line, were it copper floats?  Do you remember which type they came out?
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davidwheeler
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« Reply #33 on: 04 December, 2019, 09:23:12 AM »

They are brass but I do not remember which ones.  They seem to have changed the specifications to cope with moder fuels though.  You will find them here  http://sucarb.co.uk/float-chambers-spares/floats.html 
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David Wheeler.  Lambdas, Aprilia, Fulvia Sport.(formerly Appia and Thema as well).
Dikappa
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« Reply #34 on: 08 December, 2019, 05:09:00 PM »

Some progress over the weekend!
Friday the laser company was ready with the lower backrest frames for the seats.  They are an exact copy of the ardea items.  I had them made in 2mm thick steel as I found the originals in 1.5 mm a bit flimsy.  The original Ardea items are a bit flanged around the edges to stiffen them so I wanted that too.  Hammering by hand was not very succesfull, due to the thickness, and did not seem to help my tennis elbow (wonder where that came from...)
Saturday I decided to try to make a homemade tool for the Pullmax machine and although looking quite crude this did the job very nicely in minutes.

Today I welded the rails to the seat frames and started on making a frame on which to mount the seats.  It looks simple but took a lot of measuring and probe sitting to get it right.  Frame now welded and probe fritted in the car.  I will have to drill some holes here and there to fix it later this week, then it will have to come out again for painting.

With the bases of the seats now fitted I plan to make a wooden template for the shape of the backrests, hopefully some time for that over the week....



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JohnMillham
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« Reply #35 on: 10 December, 2019, 03:26:08 PM »

Nice to have a bit of adjustment in the seats!
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simonandjuliet
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« Reply #36 on: 10 December, 2019, 04:12:58 PM »

Love the seat frames - looks too good to hide under a seat !
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S1 Aprilia Cabrio, S2 Aprilia, S1 Promiscuo,S2 camioncino, S2 furgoncino, , R4 Sinpar, R4 Rodeo, R60 Tractor,R60 S, Moto Guzzi Ercole, Disco 3, Mini ALL4 JCW, Moto Guzzi Cardellino 73,Fulvia Berlina GT, Fulvia Rallye S, Royal Enfield Himalayan
Mikenoangelo
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« Reply #37 on: 10 December, 2019, 09:19:31 PM »

The seat frames are brilliant - can you show us the press tool please.

Mike
« Last Edit: 11 December, 2019, 09:56:38 PM by Mikenoangelo » Logged
Dilambdaman
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« Reply #38 on: 11 December, 2019, 05:31:46 PM »

Impressive! This is going to be one very special car.

Robin.
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Robin Lacey 3222

1932 Dilambda
1969 Fulvia S1 1.6HF Fanalone
Dikappa
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Posts: 380


« Reply #39 on: 11 December, 2019, 08:06:02 PM »

Thanks for the comments, I hope not too many are offended by sliding seats in a Lambda.  However my feeling is that the original car had at least two seperate backrests, which made me think about fitting two separate seats.

I did a bit of work on the car today, fitting the lower backrest plates to the frames by welding the pivot points into the frames.  Then I could not resist to try and bend some 10mm tubing into the shape I wanted for the backrests.  I want the top of those to follow the curve of the body, and discovered making one side was easy, but then bending the other side to mirror the first one is quite a challenge!
I started out using my example ardea seatframe as a template, but off course soon had to divert, since one side needed to be lower and the opposite one higher. 
Although some fine tuning has to be done, the general shape is now more or less what I had in mind.  I only used some vise grips and a very rudementary tool for bending concrete iron, and my bare hands and knees.

On the tooling: I'll have to admit that appart from collecting/restoring Lancia's my second hobby has become to collect tooling for that.  Now this has been caused mainly by driving Beta coupés for many years, and I always used to say: if you buy a Beta, welding equipment will follow soon....

With no money to spend to have jobs done on the car, and having learned a lot from my father (although he was a volkswagen beetle/bus man), I always did the work myself.  Liking things to be done proper, the tools came more or lessby itself through the years.  The past ten years I'm working as an independant, which has some advantages in this field I must admit...

Tooling used to make the seat frames are a sheet metal shear, I used a manual brake to bend over the edge at the top, and then used an hydraulic brake to completely flatten the bend (making a flattened U)  The metal used is 1.5mm thick.  Then the manual brake was used again to bend them into an L-profile
I then used the eckold machine to shrink the inner part of the L to make the nice curves in the frame.  I needed five in total to make two exacly the same, mainly due to mismeasurements on my own account....

The little lower sides of the backrests I were laser cut (not by me  Smiley ) after I copied the exact shape of the ardea frames.  To make the relief in these frames I used the pullmax.  This is a hughe machine originally mainly used for cutting metal into eg circles or other shapes, but due to it's reciprocating action, can also be used to make swages etc in metal.  Pictures hopefully explain!
The eckold is in fact an electrically driven shrinker-stretcher machine, and is the mother of all the small (and some of the really good) hand or foot operated hobby machines.  Only the eckold does is much quicker!  This is not always an advantage, it is also much quicker in completely destroying your workpiece!
My particular eckold is one only found in Holland, and is called a 'Fokker' Eckold.  I was told the 'Fokker' airplane manufacturing company operated fourhundred (!!!) of these machines.  The machine is dated approx 1960....
These machines are very wanted as they have a pedal which when operated immediately stop the operation, and this has proven very handy on more then one occasion.

Voila! Hopefully these ramblings were not too boring!

last picture is of the home made tooling to make the reliëf in the 2mm plates.  The pullmax machine can handle sheet metal up to 4mm!


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Mikenoangelo
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« Reply #40 on: 11 December, 2019, 09:59:25 PM »

Nice toy shed!! Superb work going on there - the Lambda has gone to a good home.

Mike
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Dikappa
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« Reply #41 on: 09 January, 2020, 06:18:40 PM »

High time for an update, and first of all best wishes to everyone for the new year!

Not very much done during the holidays I'm afraid, as I had to do an overhaul of the Eckold machine in the first place.  It developped a knocking noise that sort of worried me and as I use it quite often for work for a customer, I couldnt risk something breaking.  All in all I turned out there was some play in the main bearings, which were luckily standard SKF items.  So they are now replaced and the machine is running again.
Second job was getting together all spares for my 2 Monte Carlo projects, which I sold recently.  As they were dismanteled almost thirthy years ago one can imagine this took some time.  The pluys now there is more room for the Lambda spares, and the sale will fund new wheels!

Big news is that the engine is coming together well, and that probably I can pick it up end of this month, which will be combined with a visit to the auto moto retro in Turin if all goes as planned.

As the tubing to finish off the seat frames was in backorder I decided to do some work on the gearbox.  It looked and felt to be in quite good condition, with no broken gears or excessive play, but it was horrendously dirty, with black coal like stuff everywhere. 
I now fully dismanteled the unit, and started with cleaning the housing.  The parts washer, although it uses 60°C heated product and 80 bar pressure dit not get it very clean, so I decided to wet blast it.  The result is  a bit over the top IMO, but I guess it will take on some patina quickly enough when in use.  At least the wet blasting got it clean, although a bit shiny...
The bad news is that after cleaning the gearbox cover revealed a crack, so I'll have to decide if I will get it welded, or use another cover.  Sadly this was only visible AFTER two hours of cleaning off course.....

For the rest however the internals did not hold to much surprises and everything seems in good shape, except the nose of the input shaft which is worn.  It could be bushed but I decided to order a new shaft as for the moment they are available from Storicar in Italy for very reasonable money.

Some minor jobs were done such as dismanteling some of the unobtainable bearings for the brake transfer shafts, I took the bearings apart, cleaned the races, and reassembeled them with new balls, and they feel like new now.  Those bearings do not have to work very hard for their living anyway so I guess this will be ok.


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davidwheeler
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« Reply #42 on: 10 January, 2020, 10:15:46 PM »

I can't quite make out where those cracks are but they do not look very important.     If you have another top cover use it otherwise I would be tempted to fill them in with a little plastic metal - or send it to Nick Gilfillan at nick@dycomet.co.uk for cold metal spray repair (see tech. thread)
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David Wheeler.  Lambdas, Aprilia, Fulvia Sport.(formerly Appia and Thema as well).
Dikappa
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« Reply #43 on: 13 January, 2020, 03:59:50 PM »

I just had a word with an ALU welding friend (one who was a demonstrator and really knows his stuff) and he sees no problem in welding the cracks.  But as you said David, they are not stress cracks.  Something must have hit the cover quite hard, it made a mark on the outside.
I have another cover, but that belongs to a second complete housing so would rather keep that complete....

Next week we will have some items welded, such as the front brake cable pully housings, that both present cracks/miss pieces....
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simonandjuliet
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« Reply #44 on: 13 January, 2020, 06:58:09 PM »

I spend half my life de-greasing and cleaning parts and your machine sounds great ! Can you share some pics or tell us the make etc. Also what do you use as the cleaning solution ?

But looks like new !
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S1 Aprilia Cabrio, S2 Aprilia, S1 Promiscuo,S2 camioncino, S2 furgoncino, , R4 Sinpar, R4 Rodeo, R60 Tractor,R60 S, Moto Guzzi Ercole, Disco 3, Mini ALL4 JCW, Moto Guzzi Cardellino 73,Fulvia Berlina GT, Fulvia Rallye S, Royal Enfield Himalayan
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