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Author Topic: Round type and square type inlet manifolds  (Read 8989 times)
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inthedark
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« Reply #15 on: 22 February, 2008, 12:07:01 AM »

The teeth get chilly due to evaporation of the moisture on them.

an old trick for cooling items when camping was to place them under a flower pot, pour water on the
outside and wait. as the water evaporates the air inside the flower pot cools rapidly

it's science Jim, but not as we know it.................

even the gamma has a small section under the carb which is heated by the water sytem.
Geoff
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DavidLaver
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« Reply #16 on: 22 February, 2008, 08:31:53 AM »

Next time I'm camping I'll know where to put the G&T.

David
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David Laver, Lewisham.
ColinMarr
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« Reply #17 on: 22 February, 2008, 09:05:55 AM »

The pedantic answer to David’s question about the differences between 1500 and 1350 Aprilia engines is that apart from the dimensions, the larger engine produces more torque at lower revs.

The visible differences between the two, apart from the numbers, include - the later engines have:

•   A spring clip cover over the flywheel inspection aperture.
•   A larger diameter fitting for the bottom water connector at the front of the block.
•   At the top centre of the rocker cover a cast-in fitting for a bracing strut fitted to the top of the radiator. (Note that most early cars the rocker cover would have been drilled to take a bolted through fitting.)
•   The exhaust flange is angled to allow the pipe to clear the later modified engine mountings.
•   The rounded inlet manifold was a feature of the larger engine, but may also have been fitted to later 1350 engines too.


I am sure ‘La Lancia’ will have details of the differences in BHP.

Most engine parts were stamped ‘Lancia’ and in my experience mostly with the date of either 1939 or 1947.

I’ll carry on drawing air through my teeth… ‘Wind chill’ is the cooling/ chilling effect of air flow over a warm surface – the faster the flow the more rapid the heat loss. This is just what you feel when you step out into the cold on a windy day. This is simply heat transfer by thermal conduction. In a dry carburettor in the absence of fuel (or water) there will be no temperature differences and hence no cooling or heating due to air flow. As somebody said earlier, it is vaporisation/ evaporation of the fuel (change of state from liquid to gas) to gives rise to localised cooling – just like in a fridge or as in Geoff’s examples.

Colin
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DavidLaver
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« Reply #18 on: 22 February, 2008, 09:22:49 AM »


In general do parts from post war engines fit the prewar?

David
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David Laver, Lewisham.
ColinMarr
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« Reply #19 on: 22 February, 2008, 06:16:13 PM »

I think a safe working assumption is that all the bits that are unique to the larger 1486 cc engine are the block and all that’s in it. The sump may be the same overall size as the smaller 1352 cc engine, but may not be interchangeable because of the oil pump and its drive in the sump, which might be different. The heads and valve gear are certainly interchangeable.

But it may not be as simple as pre versus post-war. I think some 2nd Series cars with the larger engine were made in 1939.

Colin   
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rogerelias
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« Reply #20 on: 22 February, 2008, 09:50:37 PM »

Geoff. On the Gamma, the bit that heats the water under the carb  ,is it called the head gasket? Grin Grin
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inthedark
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« Reply #21 on: 22 February, 2008, 09:55:28 PM »

That's as bad as the post I rec'd telling me   Amy Winehouse was awarded 5 Gammas
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ColinMarr
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« Reply #22 on: 25 February, 2008, 05:54:28 PM »

Here is the photo that I wanted to accompany my post of 18 February. It’s such a perfect engine bay that it’s worth showing it, even if the carb details are mostly obscured.

Colin



* IMGP2365a.jpg (137.67 KB, 768x576 - viewed 181 times.)
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DavidLaver
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« Reply #23 on: 26 February, 2008, 09:54:32 AM »

Lovely photo Colin!!

I'm looking at the top hose now, and then the rigid pipe for the 90deg bend.  I can remember you saying how such short hoses were possible due to the radiator being mounted to the engine not the car.  Just this weekend I got my hands on an Aprilia radiator, dynamo, and the most beautiful fan/pulley.  I understand there are three and two blade types, mine is a two blade. What I've yet to fathom, or source, is a water pump.   I've decided now I'd rather go to the trouble of restoring an Aprilia pump than mounting something else.

Meanwhile here's another manifold variation - does the brace from the radiator to rocker cover make this a "late" engine?   Its interesting to compare with Scarpias setup - and the various Barchettas.

http://web.mac.com/geoffreyg/Cars/Aprilia.html#14

The site is mostly about the restoration of his SII Aurelia (he got it running just this month) but lots more Lancia interest besides.

In this weekend's bundle was a downdraught SU with an adaptor to an Aprilia manifold - VSCC approved and as easy as anything else to refurbish and setup.   A nice "getting started" solution.  It looks the part on the "round" manifold but yet to see how well it clears the rocker box cover - photos to follow when I empty the camera.

In time I'll make up a little gallery of Aprilia carb and manifold variations...

David
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David Laver, Lewisham.
DavidLaver
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« Reply #24 on: 03 March, 2008, 04:54:27 PM »

The manifold "scrubbed up nice".   This picture also shows that vacuum take off. 

David


* LateTypeManifold.jpg (55.84 KB, 600x450 - viewed 164 times.)
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David Laver, Lewisham.
DavidLaver
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« Reply #25 on: 19 March, 2008, 09:26:31 PM »


A couple of intake manifold novelties. 

The setup was first with a blower over the foot box with the shaft drive over the head and curved intake pipe to a standard inlet.  It was then revised to mount above the red manifold with the carb on top with a direct drive.   Said to improve the torque considerably but it burnt through exhaust valves too often to be usable on a road car.   I understand the blower and special pulley are long gone.

David


* SCmanifolds.jpg (92.35 KB, 600x450 - viewed 178 times.)

* SCdrive.jpg (85.64 KB, 600x450 - viewed 176 times.)
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David Laver, Lewisham.
DavidLaver
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« Reply #26 on: 19 March, 2008, 09:28:18 PM »


I've also learnt that a first series crank will fit a late series block - and that a late series block will bore out to take 78mm B20 pistons.

David
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David Laver, Lewisham.
ColinMarr
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« Reply #27 on: 13 April, 2008, 07:51:33 PM »

And here, perhaps just for the delight of Scarpia and David Laver, is a photo of something special.



* IMGP7326a.jpg (125.03 KB, 768x581 - viewed 164 times.)
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DavidLaver
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« Reply #28 on: 14 April, 2008, 10:22:51 AM »

A delight for sure!!

That looks the same as the "Nardi twin carb set up on cabriolet" on the American site I gave a link to above.  The American one isn't painted, but shows the throttle link, fuel lines, and air filters.

Where's your picture from?   Is it crackle black?   As a general question - when did Lancia move from gloss black to crackle under the bonnet?

David
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David Laver, Lewisham.
Scarpia
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« Reply #29 on: 15 April, 2008, 07:28:13 PM »

Colin,
what is the story behind this photo? Is it an old picture or is the setup still in your possession.

and by the way, is anyone clever enough to explain the relation between the engine breathing and this sort of twin carb provision. It's all very well with these bolt on extras but do we think the characteristics of the various manifolds were designed specifically for the Aprilia.? Generally the more air you can get through the engine the more power but I always wonder what other aspects I should tune to get the best out of it.I guess a rolling road is the way to go.?
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