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Author Topic: In my shed today  (Read 581 times)
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Mikenoangelo
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« on: 23 January, 2019, 09:41:41 PM »

I've been working out how to make a new rim for a headlight reflector and for the first time tried metal spinning on my aged Harrison lathe. I thought a few pictures might be of interest to other shed persons...

The idea is to form the shape by using a roller to dish, and eventually flange the workpiece. I attached a jigsawed disc of thick ply to the faceplate of the lathe, followed by a disc of 3mm aluminium to provide an edge to work the flange around, and a further disc of ply to clamp it all together. These three items were then turned to the desired I/D of the first step of the rim. A disc of 1mm aluminium for the rim was then sandwiched between the inner aluminium disc and the outer ply disc, ready to form by means of a 25mm ballrace on a bar clamped in the toolpost. Starting cautiously with the axis of the roller at 45 degrees to the edge of the workpiece, rolling to get a 45 degrees flange and eventually increasing the angle to 90 degrees to form a pillbox lid shape. Next to form the second lip of the rim I fitted a second plate of 3mm aluminium to the thick ply on the faceplate and bored this so that the pillbox would just fit within, thus obtaining an edge to make the second lip. With the original ally disc pushed into the pillbox and the outer ply disc back in place I could roll the the second lip, finally removing the outer ply and the 3mm disc so I could use a very fine sharp pointed tool cut into the face of the workpiece to liberate the finished rim.

All the way through I ensured concentricity with an 8mm rod through the centre and also put woodscrews in the same holes each time the formers were dismantled.

The outcome was satisfactory and was bonded to the reflector ready to fit to the lamp, however I had the luck through the kindness of Karl Sänger to obtain a decent original reflector so my work was no longer needed.  Never mind I learned something new which is always a good thing!!

Mike


* 1 reflector size 343.jpg (183.84 KB, 640x480 - viewed 319 times.)

* 2 metal spinning 327.jpg (284.14 KB, 640x480 - viewed 318 times.)

* 3 lid form 329.jpg (287.26 KB, 640x480 - viewed 316 times.)

* 4 Forming second stage 330.jpg (272.83 KB, 640x480 - viewed 313 times.)

* 5 flattening rim 332.jpg (283.45 KB, 640x480 - viewed 325 times.)

* 6 Rim trimmed 345.jpg (161.9 KB, 640x480 - viewed 325 times.)

* 8 Fit to reflector 355.jpg (181.29 KB, 640x480 - viewed 326 times.)
« Last Edit: 24 January, 2019, 10:38:08 AM by Mikenoangelo » Logged
frankxhv773t
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« Reply #1 on: 23 January, 2019, 11:31:01 PM »

A fine and remarkable piece of work. Most interesting.
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fay66
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« Reply #2 on: 24 January, 2019, 12:45:32 AM »

I've been working out how to make a new rim for a headlight reflector and for the first time tried metal spinning on my aged Harrison lathe. I thought a few pictures might be of interest to other shed persons...

The idea is to form the shape by using a roller to dish, and eventually flange the workpiece. I attached a jigsawed disc of thick ply to the faceplate of the lathe, followed by a disc of 3mm aluminium to provide an edge to work the flange around, and a further disc of ply to clamp it all together. These three items were then turned to the desired I/D of the first step of the rim. A disc of 1mm aluminium for the rim was then sandwiched between the inner aluminium disc and the outer ply disc, ready to form by means of a 25mm ballrace on a bar clamped in the toolpost. Starting cautiously with the axis of the roller at 45 degrees to the edge of the workpiece, rolling to get a 45 degrees flange and eventually increasing the angle to 90 degrees to form a pillbox lid shape. Next to form the second lip of the rim I fitted a second plate of 3mm aluminium to the thick ply on the faceplate and bored this so that the pillbox would just fit within, thus obtaining an edge to make the second lip. With the original ally disc pushed into the pillbox and the outer ply disc back in place I could roll the the second lip, finally removing the outer ply and the 3mm disc so I could use a very fine sharp pointed tool cut into the face of the workpiece to liberate the finished rim.

All the way through I ensured concentricity with an 8mm rod through the centre and also put woodscrews in the same holes each time the formers were dismantled.

The outcome was satisfactory and was bonded to the reflector ready to fit to the lamp, however I had the luck through the kindness of Karl Sanger to obtain a decent original reflector so my work was no longer needed.  Never mind I learned something new which is always a good thing!!

Mike

Great Stuff Mike, and certainly beyond my skill set even if I did possess a lathe!
Mike Brewer on Wheeler Dealers had someone do something similar, who made him a set of hubcaps, I think for a Messerschmidt 3 wheeler, but that was certainly a lot less complicated than this was.
Brian
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« Reply #3 on: 24 January, 2019, 02:25:37 PM »

That is an impressive piece of work. I was going to mention the Messerschimdt hub caps too. That was also very skilful and worth watching if you haven't seen it.
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DavidLaver
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« Reply #4 on: 24 January, 2019, 05:55:54 PM »


I got a little book about this ages ago and have seen a little bit of it on the TV, can't remember when.  It always seemed to be with a "big stick" the size of a large wood turning tool and the art being to manipulate the stick to the metal using a post to lever against.  Doing it with a bearing in a tool post looks much more achievable, and a deal less frightening. 

A really lovely job and an inspiration "should the need arise".

As ever LOTS on YouTube - I liked this one for the scale.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gFArS9hG5bI
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David Laver, Lewisham.
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« Reply #5 on: 24 January, 2019, 06:13:10 PM »

Carb trumpets?  For when you can't find ~quite~ the right size...

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=W7QB0-AlwtI

Hypnotic...this one is "only" a little flower pot but well filmed and shows the process well.  How many goes to work out the size of the raw disk?  Not entirely clear how the lip was done but am only watching for entertainment.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8OZ95yOTL5s
« Last Edit: 24 January, 2019, 06:25:04 PM by DavidLaver » Logged

David Laver, Lewisham.
Mikenoangelo
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« Reply #6 on: 25 January, 2019, 08:52:56 PM »

Thanks for your kind comments and interest. I called this topic  “In my shed today” which is a bit of a crib from the VSCC forum, with the idea that people could post snippets about projects they are working on which (unlike the whole saga of a complete restoration project) do not need a topic to themselves but may still be interesting to members.

To continue I’m now fiddling with the fuel gauge mechanism of the Augusta, which involves a float, a length of thread, a pulley, some cogs and a cable drive to the instrument. The drive fitted to my car seems to be a bit homemade and although it has the correct gears the  friction is too much to offer a reliable reading. In any case it doesn’t look too good! I wonder does anyone have either a drawing of the original gear case or an original I could borrow to copy, even if worn out? I see Cavallito offer a repro version but I’d prefer to have a go myself.

I also made a new trip resetting knob for the speedo as the original was missing - in case anyone else needs to know, the thread of the spindle onto which the gadget screws is M3 x 0.6mm, a non standard size but one for which Tracy Tools keep taps in stock.

In case you are wondering why I am fiddling in the shed with the twiddly bits rather than motoring - I still have to get the DVLA on side with this ex Italy car, and in any case there’s a lot of salt out there. No doubt I shall find more serious bits to attend to once we get mobile.

Mike


* Fuel Gauge gearbox 262.jpg (285.88 KB, 640x480 - viewed 215 times.)

* Trip control 305.jpg (174.07 KB, 640x480 - viewed 222 times.)
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Kevinlincs
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« Reply #7 on: 25 January, 2019, 10:03:51 PM »

Really, really nice work there.
I love seeing the ingenuity at hand here, and the mechanical nature of things like that fuel gauge is fascinating.
Please do keep us all enthused with your shed engineering  Cool
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tzf60
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« Reply #8 on: 26 January, 2019, 01:14:28 PM »

I second Kev's comment!
 
Tim
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the.cern
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« Reply #9 on: 26 January, 2019, 02:23:51 PM »


I got a little book about this ages ago and have seen a little bit of it on the TV, can't remember when.  It always seemed to be with a "big stick" the size of a large wood turning tool and the art being to manipulate the stick to the metal using a post to lever against.  Doing it with a bearing in a tool post looks much more achievable, and a deal less frightening. 

A really lovely job and an inspiration "should the need arise".

As ever LOTS on YouTube - I liked this one for the scale.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gFArS9hG5bI

If those are the hubcaps just how big is the wheel?Huh?
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DavidLaver
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« Reply #10 on: 27 January, 2019, 08:49:46 PM »


Hubcap for one of these?  There's a wheel for one in the London Imperial War Museum.

http://warnepieces.blogspot.com/2011/03/forssman-triplane-bomber-over-nyc-1919.html



* Forssman Giant Wheel at IWM.jpg (50.9 KB, 525x700 - viewed 111 times.)
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David Laver, Lewisham.
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