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Author Topic: Flavia 2000 Coupe - RHD Drive Conversion?  (Read 1342 times)
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michaelkaye
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« on: 31 August, 2018, 08:45:53 AM »

Ok a bit of a left field question: has anyone heard of a RHD drive conversion of a 2000 coupe? I'm just thinking that as it's almost impossible to find a rust free RHD (other than fully restored one for £30K plus) maybe it would be cost effective to buy a good quality LHD and have it converted to RHD?

Has anyone any experience of this? Any thoughts of whether it would be possible, any potential show stoppers?

Thanks again, Michael.
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DavidLaver
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« Reply #1 on: 31 August, 2018, 09:53:23 AM »


An idea - rent a LHD car for a weekend and see how you get on. 

Not heard of it done but I like the idea of it...  Given how many have rotted out finding the RHD bits shouldn't be an issue.  Colin Clamp (Flavia/2000 consortium) is a sensible person to call, or better still to visit to have the discussion looking at various of his cars and piles of bits.  Omicron can be generous with time on the phone and in person.
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David Laver, Lewisham.
frankxhv773t
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« Reply #2 on: 31 August, 2018, 07:03:23 PM »

Converting a LHD sounds like paying twice. You'll have to substantially dismantle it, re-engineer major parts of the car and source RHD components that are in good enough condition to make it worthwhile. If you want hen's teeth you have to play the long game and search for years if not decades. Wouldn't it be better to restore a rough RHD and know it is all good when you have finished?
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neil-yaj396
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« Reply #3 on: 01 September, 2018, 07:28:27 AM »

Converting a LHD sounds like paying twice. You'll have to substantially dismantle it, re-engineer major parts of the car and source RHD components that are in good enough condition to make it worthwhile. If you want hen's teeth you have to play the long game and search for years if not decades. Wouldn't it be better to restore a rough RHD and know it is all good when you have finished?

I think that Frank has hit the nail on the head. Buying and restoring a RHD would probably cost similar to buying a good LHD and converting it, if the latter is even practical....
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1979 1300 Beta Coupe, 1983 2000ie Beta Coupe, 2014 Ypsilon 1.2 S Series Momo
DavidLaver
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« Reply #4 on: 01 September, 2018, 08:52:39 AM »


I'd be more inclined to the conversion...

With restoration there's always ANOTHER "and while that's off" and ANOTHER "having come this far" followed by a heap of "having done that it rather shows up".  Has anyone EVER got to the end of a restoration and said "it was just about the budget I expected"?

The conversion work is going to very much depend on the RHD stuff being blanked off, and 100pct not something to start without really careful thought and planning, but its finite.

The other option is to go down the list of RHD in the club register asking if they might sell, the price would need to reflect the (expected) cost to restore rather than what a LHD car is worth.
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David Laver, Lewisham.
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« Reply #5 on: 01 September, 2018, 08:56:37 AM »


There is the "rolling resto" of doing a bit each year, save up again, do another bit. Finding someone willing to work that way is the challenge, and you'd have to accept the end result won't be a prize winner.
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David Laver, Lewisham.
stanley sweet
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« Reply #6 on: 01 September, 2018, 11:30:36 AM »

Lot of work though. RHD dashboard, pedals moved, steering etc. I have a LHD Fulvia and under the bonnet lots of things differ to RHD.  The battery and master cylinder are on the opposite side which means moving battery tray, brake pipes etc.
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bobhenry999
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« Reply #7 on: 01 September, 2018, 02:49:08 PM »

Michael,

If it is of any use, I offer the following;

I have owned a great number of Flavia/2000`s over the last 30 years, and some 7/8 years ago I was searching for a Flavia Coupe and wasted 2 years looking at a number here in the UK, but was always left a bit disappointed once I had viewed the cars, either due to corrosion or awful panel fit.

In the end I went to Italy and bought my 815 Coupe from a chap who had a collection of over 20 Lancias. I haven`t found it being LHD a problem.

In my opinion (For what it`s worth), I would rather have a rust-free LHD car than a "Restored" RHD one as most of the ones (With a few exceptions) that I have seen over the last 30 years are never as nice as a good un-restored example.

Like most of us, I don`t suppose that you would do that many miles in it anyway and it being LHD shouldn`t pose a problem. I don`t know where you live, but I am in Colchester and you are welcome to come round and drive my car if that would help you in making your decision.

Regards,

Bob



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stanley sweet
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« Reply #8 on: 01 September, 2018, 06:41:25 PM »

Bob is right. I drove my LHD for 12 years in the UK and problems were so minimal as to be negligible.  I might be behind  a truck and not be able to see past for a while but it was a rare occurrence. I don't look back on those years as difficult.  In fact, I almost felt safer because if anyone did anything stupid coming the other way they would hit a (hopefully) empty passenger side.
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1971 Fulvia 1.3S 'Leggera'  1999 Lancia Lybra 1.9JTD LX SW
frankxhv773t
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« Reply #9 on: 01 September, 2018, 07:02:24 PM »

I have a LHD Dedra and concur that driving LHD isn't a major issue. However, if RHD is a must perhaps looking abroad to, say, South Africa might be a fruitful approach.
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SanRemo78
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« Reply #10 on: 01 September, 2018, 08:29:55 PM »

I spent 3 years building a RHD Stratos replica from 1988-1991 and then 25 years driving it until 2016 before converting it to LHD, never had a problem with LHD in the UK, if fact it's easier to drive on the motorway as visibility is slightly better when looking over your right shoulder!

I also had a LHD Fiat 124 Spider that I saved and converted to RHD, hardest part was the wiper linkage so the blades swept the area in front of the driver properly.

I think that if I was the OP's position I'd look at a solid, unrestored LHD car and see how you get on with it. I'd put money on you not struggling as much as you think you might! Gear changes come naturally very quickly, the hardest part is working out how to stop glancing up and left for the rear view mirror that is now up and right!

Guy
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DavidLaver
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« Reply #11 on: 01 September, 2018, 09:25:49 PM »


LHD issues - once you've got out the car, walked round, and got in the driver's side - reaching for the seat belt not punching the passenger in the ear.
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David Laver, Lewisham.
michaelkaye
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« Reply #12 on: 02 September, 2018, 06:41:20 AM »

Thanks everyone for the replies. Itís not so much Iím concerned about a LHD, itís an obsession I have with RHD. Iíve managed to find RHD versions of cars I want. Maybe itís time to get over this obsession!!

I think Iím going to open up my search and go look at LHD cars so I can get a sense of the quality thatís out there.

I did find RHD in South Africa but it needed body work (they rust out there too) and a lovely RHD in Australia but that had just sold.

Iíll finish on my original question - part of why I was asking I  thought it might be an interesting project too. Rather than trying to restore a bad rusty example, take a solid car and undertake an engineering project of a different kind 😀
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Parisien
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« Reply #13 on: 02 September, 2018, 03:36:05 PM »

Ran a 911 as LHD daily for four years, the excitement levels for the passenger were extreme to say the least, also a Traction Avant LHD for half a dozen years, never truly a problem, I suspect the condition of the Flavia will be way more important for most buyers, plus you've alway got the Continental contingent as an added bonus into which you can sell the car when the time comes.


P
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Frank Gallagher
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« Reply #14 on: 02 September, 2018, 08:30:36 PM »

It would be a fascination project. If you found a RHD basket case with all the bits you need you would be well on your way.
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