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Author Topic: Struggles splitting a gearbox from an engine...  (Read 2921 times)
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DavidLaver
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« on: 17 January, 2008, 04:42:37 PM »


As much on the basis as its easier to move and store I've made a start splitting a gearbox and engine.  With some WD40 all the 13, 14,and 15mm nuts came free and with a light tap on the clutch lever the castings came apart maybe 5mm.  Alas that's the limit, I am presuming due to clutch splines or some such being siezed.  The little inspection plate came off easily, four 8mm nuts, and all looks well to my untutored eye.

What next?

Rolling it about on folded blankets nice clean oil found its way out the gear change lever hole - lever itself is missing - which is a good sign.  Engine is seized and my next question will be "any tips seperating head from block?"  I've no idea how to remove the timing chain for a start.

The gearbox number was clear on the top.   The engine is marked *5* on a flat area above the starter motor - mean anything to anyone?   Is there an engine number elsewhere?

David
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David Laver, Lewisham.
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« Reply #1 on: 17 January, 2008, 07:45:46 PM »

As the clutch lever acts on the thrust bearing by pulling rather than pushing you must remove the clutch lever pivot, the clutch lever can then be moved sideways enabling you to separate engine from gearbox.
Hope this is clear if not send me a PM. Ade.
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1955 Aurelia
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DavidLaver
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« Reply #2 on: 17 January, 2008, 08:03:15 PM »


Clear enough for the next visit to the lockup - thankyou!!

David
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David Laver, Lewisham.
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« Reply #3 on: 17 January, 2008, 09:24:54 PM »

if you undo the pinch nut underneath the gearbox you can easily withdraw the vertical shaft from above (with the arm on it) which allows the two elements to seperate.(same as Ade said really but that's how I remember it)
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« Reply #4 on: 17 January, 2008, 10:15:33 PM »

Back to your enquiry about taking the head off the block. Remove the large nut on the front of the camshaft where the chain goes over the pulley, be careful that you do not loose the cam wheel vernier pin, then the wheel will come forwards, oh... first you should take the plate off the front of the engine and slacken off the cam chain tensioner.  Then to get at the head bolts you need to remove the camshaft box and the outer valve rocker arms, six bolts on the cam box and three either side for the cam followers from memory. The head bolts will then be revealed!
Another thing about the gearbox, if all the gear stick has been removed from the gearbox you will have to realign the gearbox forks before putting a gear stick back in.....otherwise you will be in several gears at the same time!! The correct way to do it is to unscrew the lever, leaving the gearstick pivot in place. A mistake I have seen far too many times.
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DavidLaver
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« Reply #5 on: 17 January, 2008, 10:55:05 PM »


I've got the original AutoCar sectioned engine artwork on the wall - and a few spare heads so should be able to find the head bolts.  My "troubles" were if there were any tricks with the cam chain and vernier and with the loose pin and a tensioner to adjust there's two gottas for starters.  Thankyou again!!

David
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David Laver, Lewisham.
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« Reply #6 on: 19 January, 2008, 11:11:04 AM »

Just though of something else..... I always tie the chain to the cam wheel before removing it, then you don't loose the chain down in the sump, and it's in roughly the right place when you come to put it back again. A regards timing I can tell you how to do that when you need the info, but it's far too much info to type on here now!!!!
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DavidLaver
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« Reply #7 on: 19 January, 2008, 12:42:15 PM »

The whole engine is coming to bits "for a look" as its stood who knows how long and won't turn for who knows what reason.  The short term objective is to split into more manageable lumps.  The wonders of these "really useful box company" clip lid containers is that even the oily bits can be squirrelled away round the house. 

http://www.reallyusefulproducts.co.uk/uk/ 

When I were a lad it was icecream tubs, coffee tins, and jam jars with the oily bits under a bench with a bit of carpet over.  Tell them kids that today?

The other modern wonder is the industrial strength clingfilm.

http://www.staples.co.uk/ENG/Catalog/cat_results.asp?txtSearch=cling+film

David
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David Laver, Lewisham.
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« Reply #8 on: 19 January, 2008, 02:47:34 PM »

I find old margarine tubs very useful trouble is I've got 78 of them and they're not labelled
properly.....

Geoff Undecided
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DavidLaver
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« Reply #9 on: 19 January, 2008, 04:57:25 PM »


What I'm doing THIS time - and the newspaper everything is wrapped in is 1997 - is taking digital photos and writing a list.  My memory is being PROVEN to be inadequate.  There's stuff I just plain forgot, and the quality of parts I did remember is up and down to what I thought also.

A few things have found good homes, but the temptation to "fill in the gaps" hasn't been resisted either.  At least with more efficient packing it LOOKS as if I'm having a clearout as much as a sort out.

David
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David Laver, Lewisham.
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« Reply #10 on: 20 January, 2008, 09:05:07 AM »

For me its ice cream tubs that provide the ideal temporary storage.They seem resistant to brake fluid, oil etc (which seems ever present in all of them) and they are a bit bigger.Labelling is not really necessary (except for the wiring loom) and my hands are never clean enough anyway to do this at the time.

I must admit, taking photos the last time has really helped in 3 ways;
1)I amaze myself how innacurate my recollection of the disassemby is sometimes.Looking back at the pictures often reveals things I didn't notice at the time.
2)Not only that , its a sort of "added value" to prove what I did should I ever wish to sell.
3) it enables sharing of information online which is much better than a description alone.
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DavidLaver
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« Reply #11 on: 20 January, 2008, 09:25:58 AM »

Mr Scarpia,

Your engine looked good enough to eat, let alone eat off.  Given I'm already storing various bits in the house and may need to "exhibit" a few more what are the secrets?   

Was it blasting with the dried scales of mermaids or "only" elbow grease, time, and care?   Were the paints made from substances so poisionous they can only be sprayed in a space ship or "just" traditional brushing enamel and the correct primer?

In our LAST house the layout on the ground floor was dining room, workshop, kitchen with a sitting room and study upstairs and bedrooms up the top.  I soon realised that a coat of dark green paint over the woodchip made ALL the differance to Mrs L in terms of it "being a workshop" rather than a scuzzy back room we haven't got round to decorating quite yet.  Am hoping an Aprilia engine "display piece" in the "loftroom/study" will latch on to the same neurons and get me back some elbow room in the garage.

Alas in THIS house "the scuzzy front room we haven't got round to decorating" has just recently been "lost" to me - with new curtains, carpet, freshly painted, and a piano in the corner I'm not going to get away with storing a pile of tyres, even under a co-ordinating sheet, or doing a bit of paint stripping and derusting.  Alas the bookshelves now contain only books so no sneaking a carb or brake shoes inbetween the displays of the kids "artwork".

David
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David Laver, Lewisham.
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« Reply #12 on: 20 January, 2008, 12:12:55 PM »

actually I was previously disappointed with the applied mermaid approach and opted this time for a 1000 eunochs exhaling gently in the general direction of the castings.Patience is clearly needed but its sympathetic to the more fragile and difficult to replace parts.Once cleaned up, a quick application of mercury based paint which is then baked for 24 hours in a traditional indian tandori oven at +400, (your local takeaway can be helpful if your a regular customer as I am) and Bob's your aunt.

« Last Edit: 21 January, 2008, 06:41:08 AM by Scarpia » Logged
DavidLaver
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« Reply #13 on: 25 January, 2008, 12:30:26 PM »


Engine and box apart  Grin

The clamp bolt loosened easily, the pin moved easily enough, everything looks in order.  I now need to be careful not to lose that very light coil spring...

David
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David Laver, Lewisham.
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« Reply #14 on: 25 January, 2008, 06:33:28 PM »


The other victory today was getting the front wheels off - and all looks good there as well. 

Slowly slowly...

David


* SplitEngineAndBox.jpg (35.46 KB, 600x450 - viewed 115 times.)

* GearboxInput.jpg (57.15 KB, 600x493 - viewed 121 times.)
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David Laver, Lewisham.
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