Lancia Motor Club

General => Competition Information => Topic started by: sparehead3 on 14 March, 2011, 09:41:03 PM



Title: Lancias in Competition
Post by: sparehead3 on 14 March, 2011, 09:41:03 PM
This board is for information about Lancias being used in competitions. This can include Lancias taking part in current events or that have taken part in past events. If the event is ALSO in our events board for the year then please provide a link to it from this board.


Title: Re: Lancias in Competition
Post by: phil-m on 14 March, 2011, 10:26:02 PM
I am taking part in this years Tour Auto in my Flavia Zagato. I am in the regularity section and any advice would be gratefully received.


Title: Re: Lancias in Competition
Post by: peterbaker on 14 March, 2011, 10:35:44 PM
Concentrate on staying on the right road above all else. Then comes trying to maintain the stipulated average speed. If things go wrong catch up with the car in front, then stop for exactly one minute before setting off. If your lucky, a/ the car in front was on time b/ the control will be just around the corner. Or c/ the car in front was hopelessly lost and now d/ so are you.     


Title: Re: Lancias in Competition
Post by: peterbaker on 14 March, 2011, 10:52:20 PM
Change condensor, accelerator and clutch cables, all hoses and fan belt before you leave.  


Title: Re: Lancias in Competition
Post by: peterbaker on 14 March, 2011, 11:02:58 PM
If all the other cars turn left but your navigator says turn right. Ignore him.


Title: Re: Lancias in Competition
Post by: JohnMillham on 14 March, 2011, 11:06:02 PM
If all the other cars turn left but your navigator says turn right. Ignore him.
I don't agree. My navigator has proved he knows best on a few occasions. If he says turn right, I do!
Regards, John


Title: Re: Lancias in Competition
Post by: peterbaker on 14 March, 2011, 11:06:43 PM
When in doubt, always stop and fill up. Sooner or later you'll regret not doing it.


Title: Re: Lancias in Competition
Post by: peterbaker on 15 March, 2011, 10:43:10 PM
Most overnight halts are in large towns, even cities (hotels capable of housing everyone involved in the rally are not easy to find) which means first thing in the morning, and against the clock, finding ones way through unfamiliar territory towards the next time control which is probably twenty or thirty kms away, somewhere in the country. I would suggest spending a useful half hour at a quiet time and instead of swopping stories in the bar, check the route out of the city. How many times road works, diversions or just heavy traffic have caused me panic. Seasoned navigators have their own maps of relevent towns and don't rely just on the organisers tulip road book. Early morning starts are when you find the car wont start, you forgot to buy fuel or you left something important at the hotel. Also, bet your life there is a long queue at the check out. So another tip is to always pay your bill the night before. Last thing. Breakfast is always a missed meal for one reason or another so sweep through and collect half a dozen bread rolls, a handful of ham and a couple of bottles of water. Nothing tastes better when your late and lost in the middle of Bulgaria than a couple of unexpected ham rolls. Bliss 


Title: Re: Lancias in Competition
Post by: peterbaker on 16 March, 2011, 03:47:09 PM
Understanding basic timing. On a regularity the objective is to pass a timing point or points at exactly the right second. Early or late will mean penalties. If your average lateness is less than ten seconds per control you will probably be in the top twenty. Bear in mind maximum lateness at any one control is thirty minutes. There is no point continuing along rally route checking in at more controls unless you get back under the half hour. On an early Monte, oblivious to the rules we went OTL but battling on thinking how clever we were, staying on the correct route and finding the following controls. Of course, at each one we were still thirty plus minutes late so strictly speaking we were out of the rally. The sensible thing to do is stop the car and study the map to look for a short cut. Of course this means leaving rally route and picking up more penalities for missed controls and possibly, secret checks. But at least it means sooner or later you join back in and be back on time. At the beginning of each regularity the navigator should start the stopwatch and zero the trip. Then keep the average speed tables open on the right page so as to inform his driver whether he be fast or slow. Normally the organisers state that a control will not appear before 5kms and then they will be at ten kms apart unless on private land. Things get difficult when the route is unknown until the marshal thrusts the all important piece of paper through the window as he counts down to zero. Now the navigator has to plot the route, zero the trip and set the stopwatch. Oh yes sometimes the average speed is only declared at the same time so the navigator also has to find the right page in the speed tables. Meanwhile the driver just complains about the weather.